COVID-19 Travel Safety Weekly Worldwide Updates

COVID-19 Travel Safety – Weekly Worldwide Updates

Please use the Search option on your browser (usually CTRL+F) to find the country you are interested in.

 

LAST UPDATED – 7th of September

 

EUROPE COVID-19 Travel Safety

  • Red Zone

Azerbaijan.

  • Yellow Zone

Albania; Andorra; Austria; Belgium; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Czechia; Denmark; France; Georgia; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Kazakhstan; Latvia; Lithuania; Netherlands; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Switzerland; Turkey; Ukraine; United Kingdom; Cyprus; Moldova; Russia; Finland; San Marino; Serbia; Croatia.

  • Green Zone

Armenia; Belarus; Estonia; Liechtenstein; Luxembourg; North Macedonia; Malta; Monaco; Montenegro; Vatican City.

 

EUROPE COVID-19 Current Restrictions per Country

Albania – total of 9,380 cases, with 101 recent ones. Flights are not restrictive – commercial airlines are now operating. Albania recently opened all of its land borders, except the one with Montenegro. People no longer need permits to travel within the country. Social distancing is still in effect. There is a night curfew in place, which becomes active at 17:30. Red zones (Shkoder, Kruja, Kurbin, Tirana) are still in effect and no one is allowed to enter or leave them. Self-quarantine is not mandatory and will apply only to specific cases as ordered by the country’s health authorities. Non-essential shops, services, and businesses are reopen, with health safety measures in place. Taxi and public transportation now operate normally.

Andorra – total of 1,124 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. In Andorra, medium-level restrictions are in place. Namely, flights are partially restricted and there are thorough checks at border checkpoints.

Armenia – total of 43,750 cases, with 124 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – international flights have not resumed yet. At the moment, only citizens and residents can enter the country. Travelers finding their way in are required to complete questionnaires and are subject to 14-day quarantine. The country’s land borders are closed. Gatherings of more than 10 people are forbidden. Most non-essential shops and businesses were allowed to reopen. The border with Georgia has been closed until further notice. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory. A state of emergency is in place until September 11. The country’s borders are closed and international flights are still suspended. Commercial options exist, but are very limited. Foreigners are now allowed to enter the country, but may be subject to certain restrictions.

Austria – total of 27,166 cases, with 181 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – several airlines operate, but with severe restrictions, only special flights, or are in closure until the end of the year. Restrictive mandatory measures are in place in the country’s borders, until the end of the year. Border control is still in place. Most events are partially closed or canceled, with no effective opening date. Special events – funerals, requiring participants or seating, weddings – are partially banned. Most shops are open but face masks are mandatory. Free movement is allowed, face masks and social distancing are mandatory. Most of the country’s restrictions have been extended until the end of the year – including the number of countries that travel is not allowed from. Non-essential shops and events come with mandatory restrictive measures until the end of the year. The same applies to international movement. Non-Schengen passengers are not allowed to enter the country. Connections through Austria are limited to none. Entry from Croatia will not require a medical certificate. There’s a comprehensive list of the countries that travelers are allowed to come from and enter Austria, as well as which require medical certificates, quarantine, and so on.

Azerbaijan – total of 36,309 cases, with 135 recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – several airlines resumed certain operations, but are limited and mostly operating only special flights. Quarantine has been extended until August 31. There are areas with a stricter quarantine regime – people cannot leave the house unless they are given authorization; more areas have been added to the initial list. All travelers arriving in Azerbaijan must self-quarantine for 14-days in facilities provided by the government. All travelers are screened at border areas. Travelers must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test upon entering the country. Face masks are mandatory in airports. Passengers/foreign nationals are not allowed to enter the country until the end of September. The restrictions have also been extended until September 30.

Belarus – total of 71,523 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Commercial flights are operating to and from the country – airlines are subject to restrictions or may not be allowed to fly to certain locations. Despite numerous cases, Belarus doesn’t have many travel restrictions. Flights are only partially restricted and local travel is restricted. However, any person entering Belarus is subject to mandatory 14-day self-quarantine. Face masks are mandatory in airports and when traveling through the country. Some airlines resumed operations, but with a limited number of flights and, in most cases, only special ones – other airlines have their schedule suspended until after the first week of August.

Belgium – total of 84,599 cases, with 647 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted, with a number of airlines returning to their usual routes in June/July/August but with mandatory restrictive measures in place until the 31st of December 2020. International movement to and from Belgium is overall banned – they do allow, however, travel to and from the EU, the UK, and four Schengen countries. Events are partially banned, with limits on the number of attendants. Non-essential businesses are open – social distancing and face masks are mandatory. Non-essential shops have also instated mandatory restrictive measures until the end of the year. Mandatory restrictive measures are in place until the end of the year.

Bosnia and Herzegovina – total of 19,793 cases, with 243 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – commercial flights are now operating to and from the country. Non-residents are expected to leave the country if they spend more than 90-days in the country, or else they may be fined. Curfews have recently been lifted and social distancing is mandatory. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public places and transportation. Any travelers entering the country must self-isolate for 14 days. Most non-resident foreign nationals are banned from entering the country. Commercial flights are now operating to and from the country – restrictions are still in place, however, and it also depends from where you travel when entering the country.

Bulgaria – total of 16,164 cases, with no recent ones.  Flights are partially restricted. Most foreign nationals are banned from entering Bulgaria. If not, they must self-quarantine for 14 days, depending on the country they come from. Face masks and social distancing are still in place, both indoors and outdoors. Events are also partially closed, banned, or canceled. Non-essential shops are partially closed, with irregular opening hours. People are not allowed to enter pharmacies and grocery stores between 8:30am and 10:30 am, as they are reserved for the elderly. Flights are partially restricted, with most flights being special and not carrying travelers – restrictions on airports and in airplanes are mild. Mandatory restrictive measures are in place throughout the country until the end of the year. Depending on the number of daily cases, the country may return to stricter measures.

Croatia – total of 10,123 cases, with 262 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – face masks are mandatory in airports, as well as social distancing. Croatia Airlines has resumed its operations on August 2. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in all public places and transportation. Non-essential shops and businesses are now open but with restrictive mandatory measures in place. Events are still banned until further notice and gatherings of more than 40 people are forbidden. Travelers from certain countries will have to self-isolate upon entry in Croatia. Non-EU/EEA foreigners are given entry permission only for business reasons. Certain areas are subject to stricter measures and any increase in numbers can affect the working hours of non-essential businesses.

Cyprus – total of 1,483 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted, with severe safety regulations in place – some airlines have resumed some flights, but they are limited and/or only special. Most retailers operating in airports will be closed on Sundays, with the exception of some kiosks. Cyprus authorities recommend both travelers and citizens to avoid non-essential travel to category A and B countries, as per their epidemiological risk assessment. Events are partially closed, banned, or canceled. Overall, restrictions are slowly lifted – face masks are mandatory, as well as social distancing. Large events, such as concerts and festivals, are banned. Most non-essential shops are now open but have safety and health restrictions in place – enhanced sanitation, mandatory face mask use, etc. Gatherings of large groups are banned.

Czechia – total of 24,094 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted, with safety measures in place. Most airlines are slowly returning to their usual operations. Travel to and from Czechia is partially banned until further notice. Travelers from high-risk countries must show proof of negative COVID-19 testing if they wish to enter the country. Travel to and from low-risk countries is allowed. Most non-essential activities/shops are opened, with restrictive measures in place until further notice. Face masks are no longer mandatory – only during larger events and in the underground of Prague – and social distancing is still highly recommended. Events with less than 1000 persons are allowed as of June 22. In certain areas, social distancing and face masks are no longer mandatory – in theaters, cinemas, swimming pools, auditoriums. Citizens and visitors are allowed to freely move through Czechia.

Denmark – total of 16,891 cases, with 112 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted, most of them until 31 August 2020. Authorities advise travelers to refrain from traveling outside of Denmark until the end of August 2020. They recommend people get tested when returning from countries with a rate of over 50 new infections per 100,000 inhabitants. Events are partially banned – no more than 100 people for indoor and outdoor events. Most non-essential shops are open but, until further notice, come with mandatory safety restrictions – face masks and social distancing. Movement on a national level is also allowed, as Denmark is slowly reopening its society. Events come with restrictive mandatory measures until October. The same applies to international movement which is partially banned until August 21. Travelers from outside of the EU or the Schengen countries are considered banned and may not enter Denmark.

Estonia – total of 2,373 cases, with 10 recent cases.Flights are partially restricted. Flight restrictions are slowly being lifted, with roughly 30 different air routes opening by the end of August. Anyone traveling to Estonia is subject to 14-day isolation. At the same time, country-wide quarantine measures are in place during the latent period of infection. People are allowed to leave their homes for essential purposes but should self-quarantine for 14 days. Travelers entering Estonia are screened and may be banned from entering the country if they come from a high-risk country. Events are also partially banned or canceled, with rules of social distancing in place, namely the 2+2 rule. Non-essential businesses are open but face masks and social distancing are mandatory. There are also restrictions that prevent people from gathering in medium to large groups in the evenings. No major events will be held in Estonia until the end of August.

Finland – total of 8,077 cases, with 28 recent ones. Flights experience partial restrictions. Internal border controls and restrictions on traffic between Finland and several European countries have been lifted, but the country keeps its external traffic restrictions. Restrictive mandatory measures are still in place. Gatherings of up to 500 people are allowed, and more than 500 people will be allowed after the 1st of August. The government plans to lift gathering restrictions on the 1st of October. Non-essential shops are opened but people must respect the restrictive measures – social distancing and face masks are recommended. Travel throughout the country is allowed as long as travelers respect safety measures. Finnair reopened operations of weekly flights to and from Shanghai. International movement is partially banned until the end of August. International movement is banned until further notice. A new set of restrictions is in place until further notice.

France – total of 272,530 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are open but with mandatory restrictive measures in place – planes flying to the US, Canada, Western Africa, and Mauritius are delayed for the time being. Depending on where people travel to and from, they may be subject to quarantine. No planes will fly to the US, Canada, Mauritius, Western Africa, and the Caribbean. Travel within the EU is open, except with the UK and Spain. Travel outside of the EU is restricted. Private gatherings are allowed and public gatherings must be of maximum 5,000 people. France separated itself into departments – in green departments, most non-essential shops are opened while in orange departments some of them can reopen only their terraces. Travel throughout the country is allowed – face masks and social distancing are mandatory, especially in public places. A number of airlines have resumed certain flights or plan to do so soon.

Georgia – total of 1,469 cases, with 7 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. July may come with changes – Georgian Airways started operating. Georgian citizens/nationals traveling from outside the country will be quarantined for 14 days upon entry. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory. Shops of any type have been reopened. Gatherings of more than 10 people are forbidden. Land borders are closed – only Georgian citizens are allowed entrance or people from neighboring countries returning home. The country’s air and land borders, as well as its international tourism will remain closed until September 1, for now. International flights are restricted until October 1.

Germany – total of 242,986 cases, with 161 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted, but more and more airlines are opening their operation periods. However, non-Schengen individuals are not allowed to enter Germany unless they have a valid reason. EU and UK citizens are the only ones allowed to enter the country. Restrictions, warnings, and bans are in place for roughly 160 countries until the 31st of August. Travelers coming from a country that has more than 50 cases per 100,000 people are subject to 14-day quarantine. Gatherings of up to 10 people are allowed. Public gatherings of more than 500 people are not allowed, depending on the region. Events are partially banned – until the end of October. Most non-essential shops are closed until August 31 – face masks and social distancing are mandatory. Open businesses must instate limitations on opening hours, distance, and max capacity. People are allowed to travel through Germany freely, except in the areas with strict lockdown-type measures – such as in North Rhine-Westphalia. Restrictive mandatory measures are in place in terms of national movement until August 31. International movement is now free, with mandatory restrictive measures in place until the end of the year. Travelers returning or traveling from risk areas are subject to mandatory quarantine.

Greece – total of 10,134 cases, with 157 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – international flights will be allowed to land in both Athens and Thessaloniki. Depending on where travelers come from, they may be screened and/or subject to quarantine for 14 days. Only travelers from a limited number of countries are allowed to enter Greece. Most events and related activities are partially banned or canceled – restrictive measures are in place until further notice. Public services and non-essential shops are mostly open but with restrictive measures in place. Traffic restriction measures are still in place, to avoid overcrowding.

Hungary – total of 5,961 cases, with 291 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted, with restrictive measures in place until further notice – some airlines have resumed some flights, but are limited and irregular. Arrivals are subject to health and identity checks and even quarantine, depending on the country of origin. International arrivals are partially banned. Travel is allowed between Hungary, Czechia, and Slovakia. Travel from other countries may be subject to quarantine. Non-essential businesses are open but face masks and social distancing are mandatory. Only Hungarian citizens are currently allowed to enter the country and must engage in mandatory 14-days quarantine and may also be subject to COVID-19 testing.

Iceland – total of 2,105 cases, with 5 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – mandatory restrictive measures are in place until further notice; some airlines are set to resume operations throughout July. Gatherings of more than 100 people are forbidden. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public places. Non-essential shops and businesses are open but with mandatory restrictive measures in place until further notice. Most events and leisure services are allowed to operate/open but must respect the safety measures. At the moment, the EU, UK, and EFTA nationals will have an easier time entering Iceland. Travelers from other regions may not be allowed to enter. All arrivals are subject to 14-day quarantine. National movement is now partially banned until further notice. Events are also partially banned until further notice. A new set of restrictions is now in place, until August 27 – limit on gatherings, mandatory social distancing and face masks. People traveling from high-risk areas that plan long-term stays in Iceland are subject to PCR tests.

Ireland – total of 28,720 cases, with no recent ones. Flight restrictions are in place until further notice. Ireland’s airlines operate with reduced flight schedules as many EU countries have banned flights to them. International traveling is still restricted – travelers are advised to engage only in essential travel, especially overseas. Gatherings of more than 50 people indoors and 200 outdoors are forbidden. Most non-essential shops are open but with restrictive measures in place – face masks and social distancing. From July, people in Ireland can travel freely throughout the country. Travelers to and from around 15 countries are not required to isolate when returning to Ireland – still, foreign travelers may not be allowed to enter the country, as all but non-essential travel is still advised against. Lockdowns have been introduced in three areas – Offally, Laois, and Kidare – from August 7 until further notice.

Italy – total of 268,218 cases, with 1,365 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted, with a lot of cancellations. Travelers from the UK or from the Schengen area can enter Italy and will not be subject to quarantine. Events and services are partially banned – some opened in May, but the authorities instated restrictive mandatory measures in June that are in effect until the 31st of July. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory. Non-essential shops are open but people must respect the restrictions in place. However, social and cultural meeting centers remain closed. Travel through Italy is free as long as the safety and health measures are respected. Mass gatherings are forbidden. The country is seeing medium-level  mandatory restrictions across events, non-essential businesses, and international movement until October 15. Until then, travelers coming from countries significantly affected by COVID-19 are not allowed to enter the country. Countrywide containment measures are in place until September 7. Travelers from several countries are either not allowed to enter Italy or are subject to mandatory quarantine, PCR testing, or have to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test.

Kazakhstan – total of 105,684 cases, with 126 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – several airlines have resumed their operations or limited services, or plan to do so throughout July and August. Movement restrictions are now in place until the 29th of July. Foreign nationals are not allowed to enter the country. Any arrivals are subject to screening, testing, and quarantine. Certain areas of the country may be subject to lockdown-like measures. Some non-essential shops and businesses still remain closed. Travel within the country is limited. Public gatherings are banned. A country-wide lockdown is still in place until mid-August. The country’s restrictions have been eased on August 17 – as such, Ukraine-Kazakhstan flights have resumed. International flights to and from Germany, Netherlands, Belarus, Russia, Egypt, and the UAE are also permitted now.

Latvia – total of 1,393 cases, with 12 recent cases. Flights are partially cancelled with mandatory restrictive measures in place until further notice. International passenger carriage is not available to all international tourists. This service is not available to people traveling from a country with a rate of more than 25 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Such restrictions are in place until further notice. Travelers from and to Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia are not subject to 14-day quarantine and may engage in tourism trips in these countries. Events are partially banned, with a maximum of 25 participants – engaging in social distancing and other safety measures. Non-essential shops and businesses are open, with restrictions in place – face masks and social distancing. Travel through Latvia is allowed as long as the safety and health measures are respected.

Liechtenstein – total of 107 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. The borders with Austria and Switzerland have been reopened but screening and other restrictions may be in place. UK, EU, and EFTA citizens can freely enter the country. Other nationals may not be allowed to enter. Travelers coming from certain countries may be subject to 10-day quarantine. Social distancing measures are mandatory – so are face masks in public areas and transport. Non-essential shops and businesses were allowed to reopen. Travel and leisure services are also operating at the moment. Gatherings and events of more than 1000 people are forbidden.

Lithuania – total of 2,874 cases, with 35 recent ones. Flights to and from Lithuania are partially canceled and subject to restrictions until further notice. The government decides to resume flights on a case-by-case basis. Internal borders and airports of the EU are subject to temporary control and check-ups. Foreigners are not allowed to enter Lithuania unless they are from the EEA, SC, the UK, Ireland, or lawfully residing in those areas. If the case incidence in those areas exceeds 25 cases per 100,000 population in the last 14 days, access to the country may be forbidden. Events are partially banned – face masks and social distancing measures are mandatory. Most non-essential shops and businesses are open, usually between 8 and 22. In terms of national movement, Lithuania may be subject to nationwide quarantine – this implies closing the borders to all foreign nationals.

Luxembourg – total of 6,625 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted until further notice. Travelers must wear face masks and engage in social distancing, where possible. Flights are reduced to a minimum. International movement is partially banned, travel to and from non-EU countries may be forbidden, while travel to and from EU countries may come with restrictions. Gatherings of any type are prohibited until the 31st of July. Non-essential shops and businesses are mostly closed or facing restrictions until further notice. Travel through Luxembourg is mostly banned – social distancing is mandatory, 20 people maximum for outdoor gatherings. The country is slowly reopening, but not in a hurry.

Malta – total of 1,862 cases, with 15 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – restrictions on destinations are expected to be lifted on July 15; commercial flights to 22 countries are now operating; mandatory restrictive measures are in place until the end of the year. People arriving in Malta can stay in the country only if they spend 2 weeks in a corridor country. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas and transport. Non-essential shops and businesses are allowed to reopen but must enforce safety and health measures – such as limited capacity and occupancy. Mass events are not recommended. National movement is restricted until the end of the year. Non-essential shops and businesses must enforce restrictive measures until the end of the year – same applies to events. International movement is also seeing restrictive measures until the end of the year – the same applies to flight restrictions.

Moldova – total of 36,700 cases, with 296 recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Commercial flights are operating to and from the country, but with entry restrictions in place for foreign travelers. Social distancing is still in effect and masks are mandatory when in enclosed spaces. Self-isolation is recommended for everyone that has been in a level 3 country or in contact with an infected person. Most of the country’s borders are closed and will remain so until further notice. At the moment, only people coming from countries with less than 50 cases per 100,000 can enter Moldova.

Monaco – total of 130 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. EU, UK, and Schengen travelers are not subject to quarantine upon entering the country. Other foreign nationals must come with a certificate explaining their reason to travel. Voluntary quarantine measures are in place.

Montenegro – total of 4,727 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Travelers coming from countries with a high rate of COVID-19 infections are subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine. Some airlines have resumed operations. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory throughout the country. Local traffic and travel are subject to closure and restrictions, depending on the spread of the virus. Non-essential shops and businesses are partially closed, with restrictive measures in place until further notice. Events are banned – depending on the region, public gatherings of any type may also be forbidden, clubs may be temporarily closed, and business operations suspended. Certain foreign nationals are not allowed to enter the country. The areas of Rozaje and Gusinje have had a curfew instated at the end of July. Hospitality businesses were allowed to reopen, but must follow a strict schedule and enforce health safety measures. New limits on gatherings – maximum of 40 people outdoors and 20 indoors. Private celebrations – weddings and such – are still banned. Travelers coming from several countries must show proof of a negative PCR test before being allowed to enter the country.

Netherlands – total of 70,140 cases, with 508 recent cases. Flights are partially restricted – travel to Europe is allowed in selected countries only, while travel outside Europe is advised against. Travelers can travel to the Netherlands only if they are from a country with the same situation regarding COVID-19 status and only if they agree to respect the Dutch rules. Border closure from outside EU should be lifted. Non-essential shops and businesses are open – people must wear face masks and respect social distancing. Travel through the Netherlands implies wearing a face mask, getting a health check, and making reservations before your arrival. National movement comes with restrictive measures until the end of the year. Some airlines are expected to resume some flights throughout August.

North Macedonia – total of 14,330 cases, with 37 recent ones. Flights are not restrictive – most restrictions have been lifted but some are still in place until further notice. Most non-essential shops and businesses are closed. Events are banned or canceled. Borders are closed and allow only transit through the country – this means that those entering the country through a border crossing must leave the country via another crossing in a maximum of 5 hours. They must not leave the main road or highway.

Norway – total of 10,631 cases, with 20 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted until further notice. Travelers going in and out of Norway will most likely be checked/screened at the airport. People returning to Norway are subject to quarantine unless they are returning from Denmark. International travel is partially banned and is advised against by the authorities. Events are also partially banned – only events of up to 200 people are allowed. Some non-essential shops and businesses are open but they must ensure that customers respect the mandatory restrictive measures – face masks and social distancing. Travel through Norway is allowed with little to no restrictions. Events are still partially banned – until September. Non-essential travel is advised against until August 20. Internal restrictions have been tightened on August 7 as the number of infections has increased. Also, people arriving in Norway are now subject to 10-day quarantine. The country’s airports are open, but a limited number of flights operate. At the moment, passengers are not allowed to enter the country until 31 October, with exceptions depending on the number of cases of the country travelers come from and so on.

Poland – total of 66,870 cases, with 631 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. International flights are active, but only those to and from EFTA countries, EU Countries (except Portugal, the UK, North Ireland, and Sweden), and Switzerland. International movement is partially banned – travel to and from Poland can be done only within the EU. Events are partially banned at the moment – on the 17th of July, concerts and events in open air will be allowed, with a limit of 1 person per 5 sqm. Most non-essential shops and businesses are now open but with restrictive measures recommended. All restrictions within Poland are not mandatory, but strict respect to sanitary measures is advised, as is the wearing of face masks indoors and in crowded places. Travel through Poland is free – 2m social distancing is advised. Tighter restrictions may be in place in certain areas of the country.

Portugal – total of 57,768 cases, with 320 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted and limited – flights to and from Italy, China, and Spain are suspended. International travel is partially banned, with restrictive measures in place. Events are completely banned, with gatherings of more than ten people being forbidden. Non-essential shops and businesses are open, with recommended restrictive measures – face masks and social distancing. Travel through Portugal is free, with various recommended restrictive measures in place.

Romania – total of 86,785 cases, with 952 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted or canceled. Citizens coming from or having made a stopover in China, Italy, Iran, or South Korea are not allowed on board of Romanian aircraft. International travel is free/open, with various mandatory restrictive measures in place. Foreigners and non-EU citizens can enter Romania, with various exceptions. Events are allowed outdoors, with a maximum of 500 attendees and with restrictive measures in place – social distancing and face masks. Non-essential shops and businesses are open, with distancing measures applied. Travel through Romania is free without any restrictions. International movement is open with some mandatory restrictive measures in place until further notice. At the moment, passengers are not allowed to enter the country until September 15.

Russia – total of 990,326 cases, with 4,980 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted, with most airlines suspending both national and international flights. Travelers are not allowed to enter the country unless they have private visas issued by the Russian Foreign Ministry. The country’s borders are closed and any Russian citizens returning to the country are subject to 14-days quarantine. Travel through Russia is generally free and allowed, but restrictions are in place and may vary depending on the region. Flights to and from Switzerland are set to resume on August 15. Some international flights have resumed on August 1. The country will resume some flights to and from Switzerland on 15 August. Flights to and from Egypt, UAE, and the Maldives are not operating.

San Marino – total of 710 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Travel to, from, and through San Marino is allowed as long as the travelers inform the Prevention Department of the Italian Health Service unless they travel by plane and do not leave the airport while stationed in San Marino/Italy. Travelers from European Union countries, Schengen countries, and a few others are not subject to the previously mentioned practice. Travel through San Marino and entry to San Marino is not subject to any restrictions, but the authorities enforce social distancing and the use of face masks.

Serbia – total of 31,365 cases, with 83 recent ones. Flights are not restrictive.  International movement is banned, with all of the country’s borders being closed until further notice. Events are banned, with restrictive measures in place until further notice. Non-essential shops and businesses are partially closed. Travel through Serbia is partially banned and there’s also a curfew in place – between 17 and 5 in the morning.

Slovakia – total of 3,876 cases, with 34 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted, with most of the flights canceled and with mandatory restrictive measures in place until further notice. Travelers from Germany, Switzerland, Slovenia, Croatia, Liechtenstein, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Greece, Malta, Lithuania, Estonia, Norway, Finland, Latvia, Denmark, Monaco, Iceland, Poland, and Montenegro enjoy free movement, including flights, to and from Slovakia. International movement is still mostly banned – travelers may be subject to quarantine, depending on the country they are coming from. Travel arrangements have been made with China, Japan, Italy, South Korean, and a few others. Events are partially banned, with some Slovakian communities closing gatherings and activities. Social distancing is mandatory for events with more than 1000 people. Non-essential shops and businesses are open – face masks and social distancing are recommended until further notice. Travel through Slovakia is free/allowed, with various recommended restrictive measures. The list of countries from where people are allowed to travel to Slovakia has seen an increase in numbers – however, COVID-19 testing is required for longer stay within the country. The list of safe countries will not see any new additions from September 1 – although France, Croatia, Netherlands, Spain, Malta, and Belgium have been added on 28 August.

Slovenia – total of 2,865 cases, with 31 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted; flight restrictions have been canceled. International movement to and from Slovenia is partially banned, with mandatory restrictive measures in place until further notice. Travelers coming/returning from other countries are subject to 14-day quarantine. Events are banned and public gatherings must have a maximum of 50 attendees. Non-essential shops and businesses are mostly closed, with mandatory restrictive measures in place. Shopping centers have been opened but social distancing measures must be respected. Travel through Slovenia is partially banned – mandatory guidelines are in place, such as face masks and social distancing.

Spain – total of 455,621 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted/limited with restrictions having been canceled. International movement/travel is still banned and people entering Spain are subject to 14-day quarantine. Only EU and Spanish residents/citizens are allowed to enter Spain, for valid reasons. Events are banned – public gatherings are forbidden. Non-essential shops and businesses are partially closed, with restrictive measures in place – social distancing and face masks. Travel through Spain is partially banned – people may move within the country depending on the region they are in and the region they want to travel to. A majority of airlines have resumed some flights or plan to do so in the following months.

Sweden – total of 83,958 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted and restrictions are partially canceled. Flights from non-EEA countries may be canceled. The country’s borders are closed until the 31st of August – except for EEA countries, the UK, and Switzerland. International movement is partially banned and subject to mandatory restrictions until the 31st of August. Events are partially banned, with social distancing measures in place. Non-essential shops and businesses are open with mandatory restrictive measures in place – face masks and social distancing. Travel through Sweden is allowed, but mandatory restrictive measures are in place – people are free to travel through Sweden. Travel to Denmark, Switzerland, and Norway is now exempted from the non-essential travel recommendation. Most of the other European countries still fall under that recommendation until the 12th of August.

Switzerland – total of 42,014 cases, with 292 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted and the regulations are partially canceled. It is mandatory to wear face masks and engage in social distancing in airports. Travel is allowed for people from the EU, EFTA, and the UK – but travelers from certain countries may be subject to quarantine. International movement is partially banned – restrictions may be lifted, on 20 July, for a number of third countries. Events are partially banned with mandatory restrictive measures in place until the 31st of August. Events of more than 1000 people are forbidden, while gatherings of more than 30 and 300 people are allowed. Non-essential shops and businesses are now open, with restrictive measures in place until the end of the year. Opening hours for non-essential businesses are no longer restricted. Travel through Switzerland is free – people over 65 and with underlying medical conditions are advised to avoid public places and large gatherings. Face masks and social distancing are compulsory in public transport and most indoor spaces.

Turkey – total of 268,546 cases, with 1,482 recent ones. Flights are partially restrictive, with some restrictions more or less canceled, with recommended measures in place until further notice – some airlines have resumed some flights at the end of July while other plan to do so throughout August. Reportedly, flights to and from 20 countries are forbidden. International movement is partially banned – people returning to Turkey are subject to self-isolation for 14 days. Events are partially banned – sports are allowed but with no audience. Non-essential shops and businesses are mostly open, with recommended restrictive measures in place. Travel through Turkey is partially banned – face masks and social distancing are recommended. Travelers coming from Afghanistan are not allowed to enter the country.

Ukraine – total of 119,074 cases, with 2,096 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Most airlines are slowly reopening their flight schedule – flights to and from Italy are now restriction-free and some commercial flights are now operating. Flights to six destinations are cancelled until August 15. Citizens and foreigners arriving in Ukraine are subject to supervised 14-day quarantine. International movement is slowly reopening – Ukraine has opened its borders to foreign nationals. Travelers coming from Red Zone countries will be the only ones subject to quarantine. Non-essential shops and businesses are now open, with most of the restrictions having been lifted – face masks and social distancing are still recommended. The country is currently under a nationwide lockdown until August 31. Passengers are not allowed to enter the country until September 28.

United Kingdom – total of 334,467 cases, with 1,715 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted, with some flights being canceled. Currently, travelers from 59 countries are not required to quarantine upon entering the UK. International movement is free, with recommended restrictive measures in place – people are advised not to travel unless they have to. Events are banned until further notice – bars and hotels may reopen but with safety measures in place. Non-essential shops and businesses are partially closed – they slowly reopen, especially in Scotland. Travel through the UK is partially banned – people shielding themselves are allowed to engage in various no-contact activities. Groups of more than 8 people are forbidden. Other types of events are cancelled/closed until further notice. Some airlines may resume flights throughout August.

Vatican City – total of 12 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – overall, the same measures and restrictions as in Italy apply. However, keep in mind that people may not be allowed to enter Vatican City without a valid reason/purpose.

 

EUROPE COVID-19 Safest Countries to Travel

  1. Liechtenstein (107 cases)
  2. Monaco (147 cases)
  3. San Marino (716 cases)
  4. Andorra (1,215 cases)
  5. Malta (2,039 cases)

 

EUROPE COVID-19 Official Statements and Updates

The European countries with the most reported cases in the last week are Russia, Spain, United Kingdom, France, and Italy.

Most deaths are in United Kingdom.

The trend has been, overall, increasing throughout the continent.

 

 

NORTH AMERICA COVID-19 Travel Safety

  • Red Zone

Dominican Republic; El Salvador; Honduras; Guatemala; Mexico; Panama; Cuba; Belize

  • Yellow Zone

Barbados; Bermuda; Canada; Greenland; Jamaica; Trinidad and Tobago; United States; Costa Rica; Dominica; Cayman Islands; Puerto Rico; Montserrat; Turks and Caicos Islands.

  • Green Zone

Antigua and Barbuda; Bahamas; British Virgin Islands; Grenada; Guadeloupe; Martinique; Nicaragua; Saint Barthelemy; Saint Lucia; Saint Kitts and Nevis; Saint Pierre and Miquelon; Saint Vincent and the Grenadines; Saint Martin; Sint Maarten; Bahamas; Haiti; Anguilla.

 

NORTH AMERICA COVID-19 Current Restrictions per Country

Anguilla – total of 3 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Airports have been closed until October 31. All new arrivals are subject to 14-day quarantine. The ferry service has been suspended. Gatherings of more than 25 people are forbidden. Most social gatherings are forbidden. Non-essential shops and businesses are allowed to reopen but must ensure social distancing measures. Border closure has been extended until the end of October.

Antigua and Barbuda – total of 94 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – travelers entering the country must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test. Arrivals are also subject to screening, testing, and quarantine. The country is under a state of emergency until October 31. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas. Non-essential shops and businesses, as well as most social activities, are forbidden.

Bahamas – total of 2,135 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – Silver Airways has resumed operations; inbound and outbound commercial flights are allowed to operate. Keep in mind that schedules are still limited and subject to change. Travelers entering the country must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test. They are also subject to screening measures. The country is under a state of emergency until July 31. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory. Travel between the islands is possible. There is a curfew from 10pm to 5am. Non-essential shops and businesses, as well as touristic attractions, are open but have restrictive measures in place. The country is under a public state of emergency until the end of September. Weekends may be subject to full lockdown, depending on the rate of new cases. Travelers arriving in the country are subject to quarantine and to COVID-19 testing. All international flights in New Providence are banned.

Barbados – total of 170 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Travelers arriving to the island are subject to 14-day mandatory quarantine. Travelers from CARICOM countries may choose to self-quarantine at home. A curfew between 10pm to 5am is in place, Friday to Sunday. Social distancing and face masks are recommended. Travelers who provide a certificate that confirms that they are COVID-19 negative are allowed to enter the island. The country is under a state of emergency until August 31.

Belize – total of 964 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – commercial flights to and from the country are very limited. The country’s airports are closed until September 30. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory. Travelers arriving in Belize are subject to mandatory quarantine. The country’s borders are still closed for all non-essential services. Belize’s airports are expected to open after the 15th of August and will allow entry only to travelers that provide proof of being COVID-19 negative. The State of Emergency has been extended, on August 14, for another 28 days. Philip Goldson International Airport will reopen on October 1.

Bermuda – total of 169 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Travelers coming from or who have been in certain Asian countries are subject to mandatory quarantine when entering Bermuda. Gatherings of more than 20 people are forbidden. International movement is partially banned. Non-residents are subject to testing and screening upon entering the country. Depending on the country they come from, travelers may be denied entry.

British Virgin Islands – total of 35 cases, with no recent cases. Flights are totally restricted. Seaports are also closed. At the moment, only nationals are allowed to enter the country – foreign nationals are expected to be allowed to enter in September. There is a curfew in place, from midnight to 5 in the morning. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas. Beaches are open on a schedule. Anyone arriving in the country is subject to 14-day quarantine. A two-week curfew is in place until further notice due to the increase in the number of cases.

Canada – total of 127,789 cases, with 116 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted; most Canadian airlines reopen their domestic operations in July. Windsor International Airport is expected to resume operations, including commercial flights, throughout September. Social gatherings are forbidden. Non-essential shops and businesses are partially closed and people are advised to avoid any non-essential movement through the country. Travelers entering Canada may be subject to 14-day quarantine and must present a credible quarantine plan that they will respect. Face masks and social distancing are recommended indoors, on public transport, and in crowded places/areas. Most foreign nationals are not allowed to enter Canada. Travelers with symptoms of COVID-19 will not be allowed on board. Face masks are mandatory in flight. The country’s borders are still closed until August 14, while mandatory quarantine is extended until August 31. Some airlines have resumed limited operations or will be doing so throughout August, September, and October. The region of Nova Scotia is under a State of Emergency until August 23.

Cayman Islands – total of 205 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – domestic services are reduced. All inbound and outbound flights are canceled. People traveling from China are not allowed to enter the country. Residents can return, but they are subject to quarantine. Travel within the country is restricted – inter-island flights are available, but mostly only to essential personnel. Gatherings of more than 6 people are forbidden. Some non-essential shops and businesses are open. Curfews may be in place. Public transport is restricted to 50% capacity. People can now freely leave Cayman Islands. The country’s borders were expected to open around October 1 – however, the government postponed these plans.

Costa Rica – total of 39,699 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Travelers coming to Costa Rica from any other country must self-quarantine for 14 days. Vehicle travel is entirely restricted – people are allowed to travel only to essential businesses/services. Citizens and residents of Costa Rica are allowed to return to the country, but they will be subject to quarantine. The economic reopening of the country has begun – some flights to Liberia and San Jose have been reintroduced in the flight schedule. People from the EU, the UK, and Schengen Zone are now allowed to enter Costa Rica. Still, entry in the country is subject to various restrictions and/or requirements. US citizens will be allowed to tour Costa Rica from September.

Cuba – total of 3,925 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Face masks are mandatory in all places, even in personal vehicles. Social distancing measures and regulations are in place. People are advised to not leave their homes unless for essential reasons. Anyone entering Cuba from a high-risk country or presenting symptoms related to COVID-19 may be isolated by the authorities. Nationals and foreign residents of Cuba are the only ones allowed to enter the country; will be subject to isolation. Havana is under lockdown again. International tourists can now use the partially reopened borders of the country to visit Cuba. A curfew has been imposed in Havana due to the increasing number of cases in the region.

Dominica – total of 20 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – the Douglas Charles airport and the country’s borders are now opened for non-nationals. Arrival protocols and restrictions are in place. A curfew is in place, from 10pm to 5am Monday to Sunday. Non-essential shops and businesses are operating normally, but face masks and social distancing are mandatory. Gatherings of more than 10 people are forbidden. Travelers arriving in Dominica or returning nationals/citizens are subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine. Non-nationals will be allowed to enter the country starting with August 7 – however. self-quarantine will be mandatory. Hotels, guest houses, and travel leisure services are partially reopened and function on a limited basis – they also enforce restrictions, of course. Non-nationals are allowed to enter Dominica – quarantine will be mandatory for them.

Dominican Republic – total of 94,241 cases, with 509 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Travelers that have recently traveled through Europe, China, Iran, and South Korea and wish to enter the Dominican Republic are subject to quarantine. Economic, recreational, and social activities are forbidden between 8pm and 5am. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory. Non-essential shops and businesses are mostly closed or can offer only delivery services. Events have been canceled for the time being. All of the country’s borders are currently closed. People entering the country are required to show proof of a negative COVID-19 text. The country is currently under a State of Emergency until after August – curfews are in place. Starting with September 15, passengers are no longer required to present a medical certificate/proof of a negative COVID-19 test.

Greenland – total of 14 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – Air Greenland canceled any Copenhagen flights until September. People are advised to stay at home and everyone entering Greenland is advised to self-isolate for two weeks after their arrival. Face masks and social distancing measures are mandatory. Travelers wishing to enter Greenland with reduced quarantine must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test upon entrance and will be required to re-test five days after their arrival in order to end their two-week quarantine.

Grenada – total of 24 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – charter flights can operate. Any new arrivals – either by air or sea – are subject to mandatory 14-days quarantine. Travelers must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test and are subject to screening. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas and transport. Non-essential shops and businesses are allowed to reopen. Gatherings and events of more than 20 people are forbidden. Foreigners coming from several countries are required to quarantine for 14-day upon entering Grenada. Commercial flights to Europe, Canada, and UK have been reportedly reopened on August 1.

Guadeloupe – total of 1,145 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. All arrivals must self-isolate for 14 days. Travel within and between the islands is allowed. Gatherings of more than 10 people are forbidden.

Guatemala – total of 73,679 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. The country’s airports are closed until September 17 and any arrivals are subject to quarantine. La Aurora International Airport is expected to resume commercial flights on September 18. Travelers returning to or arriving in Guatemala are subject to 14-days quarantine. Vehicle travel is restricted based on license plate numbering – on odd and even numbers. At the moment, only residents and citizens of Guatemala are allowed to enter the country. Not all of the country’s borders are closed – travelers that wish to leave Guatemala may do so via the El Carmen border. Some restrictions have been lessened – but the curfews are still in place and the country’s borders remain closed. The country is under a state of public calamity until September 5.

Haiti – total of 8,209 cases, with 35 recent ones. Flights are not restricted, but travelers entering the country are subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine. Until 20th July, there is a curfew in place between 8pm and 5am, as well as a limit on internal movement. People in Haiti are advised to engage in essential movement only. Gatherings and any type of activities of more than 10 people are forbidden. Face masks are mandatory in public places. Borders and ports are entirely closed for the time being. International flights are not actively planned but services to the USA, Canada, and Europe are sometimes available. The country’s state of emergency has been lifted on July 27 – this has lessened the restrictions throughout the country.

Honduras – total of 59,645 cases, with 835 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. International flights are expected to resume on August 17. People that have traveled to a country with confirmed cases and are returning or entering Honduras may be isolated for 14 days. Essential activities and shopping are allowed in the country from 9am to 5pm, based on the last digit of their passport number or identity card. The country’s borders are, for the moment, closed. Returning residents and citizens will have to self-quarantine. Travelers coming to Honduras from highly affected countries are required to provide the authorities with precise trip details in terms of the countries and areas they have visited in the last 30 days. National Curfew is in place until 12 July.

El Salvador – total of 25,635 cases, with 98 recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. San Salvador airport closed until September 18. Any passengers landing in El Salvador are subject to 14-day quarantine. Travel through El Salvador is not allowed, since a 24/7 curfew is in place. People are allowed to leave their homes only for essential purposes. Face masks are mandatory. Public transportation is suspended. Foreigners are currently forbidden to enter the country. Country residents and citizens are allowed to return to El Salvador but are subject to quarantine in governmental facilities. The second phase of restriction-lessening has been postponed to 21st July – however, most travel-related restrictions are still in place and the government stated that they may not reopen tourist services before mid-August.

Jamaica – total of 2,113 cases, with 102 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Face masks are mandatory in public places. There is a daily curfew in place, between 11pm and 5am, until 31 July. Travelers coming from countries with a certain risk of infection are required to quarantine for 14 days. Anyone wishing to travel to Jamaica must apply for Travel Authorization. Travelers may be tested for COVID-19 upon landing in Jamaica. After July 10, travelers have to upload a PCR test result if they wish to travel to the country.

Martinique – total of 596 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – all new arrivals are subject to 14-day quarantine. Commercial flight options are limited. Travel certificates are required to enter the islands, including some surrounding islands from Martinique.

Mexico – total of 591,712 cases, with 5,974 recent ones. Flights are not restrictive, with most Mexican airlines reopening their flight schedule, but with limited destinations. Commercial flights are currently operating to and from the country, with various restrictions in place. Hotel reservations are no longer possible. The authorities recommend travelers that are currently in Mexico to return to their home countries. Social distancing and similar measures are mandatory, especially in public areas. Mandatory quarantine is not in place – people are advised to self-quarantine in case of symptoms. The shared border with the US is now closed until September 21.

Montserrat – total of 13 cases, with one recent case. Flights are partially restricted. All borders are closed. Entry into the country is based on a declaration form that has to be submitted 3 days before your arrival. Face masks are mandatory on planes. Travelers are subject to screening and to 14-day self-quarantine. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas. Gatherings of more than 10 people are forbidden. Visitors are not allowed to enter the country at the moment.

Nicaragua – total of 4,494 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – airports have reopened. Commercial flights are expected to resume in August, but no clear date is available. Travel through Nicaragua is free and not subject to extreme/mandatory restrictions. Quarantine policies are not in place. People and travelers are advised to engage in precautionary health measures. The country’s borders and airports are completely closed. Still, travelers can freely enter or exit the country. Those arriving will be screened and quarantined if showing symptoms.

Panama – total of 91,337 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – flights are suspended until September 22. Still, domestic flights are suspended until July 22. The Tocumen International Airport has begun its phased reopening which involves off path travels. Special flights are being operated on a commercial basis. The country is currently in a state of emergency, with a curfew in place as well – between 7pm and 5am. People are advised to stay in their homes and shouldn’t leave unless they are allowed via the regulations in place or have an emergency. The country’s borders are closed – anyone entering Panama is subject to 14-days of self-isolation. Anyone with symptoms will be taken to the hospital and eventually in quarantine. The restrictions have been lessened a bit with the start of August, but not drastically.

Saint Barthelemy – total of 18 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – commercial departure options are limited. Travel within the islands is allowed. Travel certificates may be required to travel to the French Overseas. Social distancing is mandatory in public areas. Beaches may have limited operating hours.

Saint Kitts and Nevis – total of 17 cases, no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – airports are closed, flights are suspended, and the country’s borders are also closed. All new arrivals are subject to 14-day mandatory quarantine. No one is allowed to enter the country unless they have valid reasons. Travel within the country is free. Most restrictions have been lifted – non-essential shops and businesses are now open, while face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public places. Social events may still be forbidden. Borders are expected to be reopened, but with new health protocols in place.

Saint Lucia – total of 26 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – flights have begun to re-operate; there are 2 weekly flights from and to UK, as well as flights from and to the US; flights with Canada are set to restart during August. All borders are closed. Anyone entering the country must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test. Travelers are subject to screening measures. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory throughout the country. Saint Lucia is currently under a state of emergency until the end of September. Non-essential shops and businesses are now open.

Saint Martin – total of 213 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – commercial departure options are limited. Travel within the islands is allowed. Travel certificates may be required to travel to the French Overseas. Social distancing is mandatory in public areas. Beaches may have limited operating hours. Gatherings of more than 10 people are forbidden. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory. Travelers from the US are now allowed to enter the country – starting with August 1.

Saint Pierre and Miquelon – total of 5 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. The same restrictions as other French colonies apply.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines – total of 60 cases, with no recent cases. Flights are partially restricted – people arriving are subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine. International flights are currently suspended until further notice. People entering the country are subject to screening and testing. Local travel is limited. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas and transport. Hotels and private rentals are not fully opened. Non-essential shops and businesses are open. Flights from the US may be banned.

Sint Maarten – total of 460 cases, with 16 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Travelers that show proof of a negative COVID-19 test are subject to relaxations of travel restrictions. Most airlines have resumed flights to and from neighboring islands, as well as from the US. Social distancing is mandatory in public areas. All commercial flights to and from the US are postponed until August 15.

Trinidad and Tobago – total of 1,683 cases, with 38 recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Airports are closed until September 30. The country is set to lift all of its restrictions, gradually. As such, most non-essential shops and businesses are now open, as well as most events and activities being available. Gatherings and groups of more than 25 people are forbidden. People must wear face masks in public and engage in social distancing. Any travelers entering Trinidad and Tobago are subject to 14-day quarantine. The country’s borders and international flights are closed/cancelled until further notice.

Turks and Caicos Islands – total of 490 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Commercial flights are available but operate with limited routes. Entry and transit through the islands are forbidden until July 22. Any travelers that are allowed to enter the country must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test. Some provinces are subject to curfews until July 20. Gatherings and events of more than 10 people are forbidden. Domestic sea and air travel between the islands are forbidden until July 20. Entry to or transit through the islands are now permitted – but is based on visa and pre-travel authorization, as well as on a negative COVID-19 test. Only inter-island travel is allowed until August 31.

United States – total of 6,147,434 cases, with 8,356 recent ones. The entirety of the US is considered a yellow zone, with several prevention measures in place but with no restrictions on entry. Flights may be partially canceled but not subject to mandatory restrictions. The states are enforcing quarantine measures but national travel is not forbidden. Non-essential shops and businesses may be open or closed, depending on the state, but most of them are open. Face masks and social distancing in public areas are advised but not mandatory. Indoor public services enforce the use of face masks, mostly. As of August, the restrictions throughout the country seem to remain the same – some states, however, began adopting much stricter measures than their neighbors. If traveling to the US, it is highly recommended that you consult with your travel agency regarding the state you will travel to.

 

NORTH AMERICA COVID-19 Safest Countries to Travel

  1. Bahamas (2,506 cases)
  2. Nicaragua (4,668 cases)
  3. Haiti (8,360 cases)

 

NORTH AMERICA COVID-19 Official Statements and Updates

The North American countries with the most reported cases in the last week are United States and Mexico.

Most deaths are in United States.

The trend has been, overall, increasing throughout the continent.

 

 

SOUTH AMERICA COVID-19 Travel Safety

  • Red Zone

Argentina; Bolivia; Brazil; Chile; Colombia; Ecuador; Guyana; Paraguay; Peru; Suriname; Venezuela.

  • Yellow Zone

 

  • Green Zone

French Guiana; Uruguay; Falkland Islands.

 

SOUTH AMERICA COVID-19 Current Restrictions per Country

Argentina – total of 401,239 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Some flights may be allowed to operate – from Europe and USA. Depending on the province, quarantine may be enforced or free movement may be allowed, as long as people wear face masks and respect social distancing measures. Gatherings of more than 10 people are forbidden. Non-essential shops and businesses are slowly reopening, depending on the province. Foreigners and residents arriving from a country with active transmission must self-isolate. Travel restrictions may be enforced with little to no notice, depending on the province. Borders remain open for exits and departures, but entry is not allowed or extremely limited. Buenos Aires is under lockdown until August 16. Commercial flights are still banned – until September 1.Multiple cities are now seeing stricter restrictions until August 30.

Bolivia – total of 115,354 cases, with 945 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public places. Vehicle travel may be forbidden, while residents may not be allowed to travel more than 500 meters away from their home. National quarantine may be in place. All of the country’s borders are currently closed. Bolivian residents and nationals are not ensured with entry and may require approval. National quarantine has been extended until August 31.

Brazil – total of 3,846,965 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are not restrictive – most Brazilian airlines plan to slowly reopen domestic flights in the country. Limited direct commercial flights are now operating. Non-essential shops and businesses are closed in most parts of the country. Local transportation may also be suspended or limited. Most cities come with mandatory safety measures – such as the use of face masks and social distancing in public areas. Some Brazilian cities may operate under lockdown measures. Travel through Brazil may be restricted. Foreigners are not allowed to enter the country – although this decree is set to expire soon. Passengers in international transit are allowed to land in Brazil and wait for their connection flight but must not leave the airport. International air travel is now reopened to foreign tourists.

Chile – total of 408,009 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – 2 airlines have resumed flights, one with strong security measures in place. The country is in a state of quarantine that is slowly applied to more and more comunas. Travelers and residents entering the country are subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine. However, entry to the country may be limited or restricted. Changes in the lockdown and quarantine measures may come with no notice at all. Commercial airline options are currently available within the country – only nationals and valid visa holders may, however, enter the country. At the moment, passengers are not allowed to enter the country until September 14. A state of catastrophe is in place until September 25.

Colombia – total of 599,914 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – 2 airlines have resumed flights, while one has filed for bankruptcy. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas and transportation. The country may be subject to lockdown measures, depending on the condition of every municipality. All people arriving in Colombia are subject to a 14-day self-quarantine. International travel is banned until September, while domestic air travel has been reopened. The country is currently experiencing lockdown measures until July 15. The country’s mandatory isolation will continue until September 1. Commercial domestic air services will resume on September 1 – the options will be limited. General border closure is in place until October 1.

Ecuador – total of 112,906 cases, with no recent ones. Flights partially restricted – Avianca Ecuador plans a Quito-Lago Agrio route in July. Arrivals to Ecuador will be subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine. State of Emergency is in place until 15 August. Face masks are mandatory in public places. People traveling on domestic flights through Ecuador must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test. Public gatherings are forbidden. Non-essential shops and businesses are reopening but must enforce health prevention protocols. International travel is allowed, but limited or with several restrictions in place. The country’s State of Emergency has been extended until August 15.

Falkland Islands – total of 13 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Nationals and residents returning to the country are subject to 14-day quarantine – same as passengers arriving by air or boat.

French Guiana – total of 9,076 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. New arrivals are subject to medical examinations and 14-day quarantine. Most international flights are still suspended. Entry to French Guiana is based on an international travel certificate. Some areas may have a curfew or lockdown-like measures in place. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas and transport. The country is under a State of Emergency until October 30.

Guyana – total of 1,184 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Airports are closed until September 30. Non-essential shops and businesses are closed. Lockdown measures are in place. Gatherings of more than 5 people are forbidden in the capital. Borders are mostly closed, but this aspect is subject to change. Travelers from several high-risk countries may experience additional screening upon entry. Persons who show symptoms or test positive for COVID-19 may be forcibly quarantined.

Paraguay – total of 16,474 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Borders are closed, except for residents and citizens of the country. Those that enter or return to the country are subject to mandatory 14-day self-isolation. Movement through the country is mostly banned, as Paraguay is in a state of emergency. Face masks are mandatory in public areas and transportation. There is a curfew in place, from 11pm to 5am. The country is slowly lifting its restrictions, with most areas being in phase three – where social distancing and face masks are required, with most businesses reopening their doors.

Peru – total of 639,435 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – one airline is known to operate. Some international flights will resume and borders will be partially opened starting with October 1. The country is in phase three of restriction relaxation: non-essential shops and businesses can reopen with various restrictions in place, face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas and transportation, certain areas are not allowed to reopen their businesses. The country is in an extended state of emergency, until July 31. A curfew is in place, between 10pm and 4 am, with the exception of some areas that have different curfew times. People can apply for a travel permit that allows them to break some of the curfew and travel restrictions. Those traveling to, from, and through Peru may be subject to 14-day quarantine. The country’s State of Emergency has been extended until the end of August – curfews are in place.

Suriname – total of 3,954 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Residents and citizens returning to the country are subject to 14-day quarantine. All of the country’s borders are closed and travelers that are still in Suriname are advised to contact their embassies. International borders are completely closed – also, all road and air travel is blocked.

Uruguay – total of 1,570 cases, with no recent cases. Flights are totally restricted – some international flights are known to operate. People arriving from abroad are subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine. Self-quarantine is recommended for all the residents of Uruguay. Social distancing is recommended. Face masks are mandatory in pharmacies, supermarkets, and the authorities recommend people to use them in public as well. Events and activities are mostly closed. Uruguay reopened its borders for tourism with EU nationals only.

Venezuela – total of 44,946 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. International regular commercial and domestic flights will resume on September 13. The capital of Venezuela is reportedly surrounded by military checkpoints. People arriving from abroad are advised to enter 14-day self-isolation. The nationwide lockdown has been extended until July 12. Travelers from Europe, Dominican Republic, Colombia, and Panama are subject to various entry restrictions. People suspected of being infected with COVID-19 are placed in 30-day quarantine. Commercial flights are still banned  – until August 12. Seven-day quarantine may be mandatory, depending on circumstances.

 

SOUTH AMERICA COVID-19 Safest Countries to Travel

  1. Falkland Islands (13 cases)
  2. Uruguay (1,679 cases)
  3. Suriname (4,320 cases)

 

SOUTH AMERICA COVID-19 Official Statements and Updates

The South American countries with the most reported cases in the last week are Brazil, Peru, and Colombia.

Most deaths are in Brazil.

The trend has been, overall, increasing throughout the continent.

 

 

 

AFRICA COVID-19 Travel Safety

  • Red Zone

Angola; Cape Verde; Eritrea; Ethiopia; Kenya; ; Libya; South Africa; South Sudan; Uganda; Zimbabwe; Lesotho; Rwanda; Algeria; Morocco; Guinea; Mozambique; Gambia.

  • Yellow Zone

Benin; Botswana; Burkina Faso; Burundi; Cameroon; Central African Republic; Djibouti; Egypt; Gabon; Ghana; Malawi; Mali; Madagascar; Nigeria; Namibia; Republic of the Congo; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Togo; Zambia; Chad; Democratic Republic of the Congo; Liberia; Sudan.

  • Green Zone

Burundi; Comoros; Guinea-Bissau; Mayotte; Niger; Reunion; Sao Tome and Principe; Tanzania; Tunisia; Mauritania; Ivory Coast; Seychelles; Mauritius.

 

AFRICA COVID-19 Current Restrictions per Country

Algeria – total of 43,781 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Commercial flights are not operating to and from the country. Lifting of current restrictions is done gradually – non-essential shops and businesses are slowly reopening. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory – provinces with businesses that do not enforce these will remain locked. Face masks are mandatory in almost any type of location. The country’s land borders are completely closed. Curfew may be in place in some of the country’s provinces. Some facilities and public services are suspended until September. People returning to Algeria are subject to 14-day quarantine. Special flights may be organized for foreigners stuck in Algeria. 29 provinces are seeing lockdown measures until mid-August. Lockdown measures have been lessened on August 9 – curfew has been shortened; the travel ban that affected 29 provinces has also been lifted.

Angola – total of 2,551 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Commercial flights to and from Angola are now operating, but are very limited. Non-essential shops and businesses are reportedly open and fully staffed. Seating in businesses is limited to 50% capacity. Hotels and guest houses are said to have been reopened as well. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory. Travelers entering the country are subject to 14-day quarantine. Foreigners locked in Angola had their visas extended until the end of August. New arrivals must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test or enter quarantine. The country’s land borders are closed.

Benin – total of 2,145 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – commercial flights are now operating to and from Benin. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory where possible. Public transport capacity is limited. Gatherings of more than 50 people are forbidden. Flight options are very limited. Travelers entering Benin are subject to a COVID-19 test and to an entry visa. Travelers will have to self-isolate until the test results come in. Travelers will have to pay for the tests and their identification documents will be withheld by the airline until the results come in.

Botswana – total of 1,633 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. A State of Public Emergency is in effect until around August. The lockdown has been lifted in certain areas of the country. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory, especially in public areas and transportation. Travel between the country’s coronavirus zones requires a permit. Anyone entering Botswana is subject to 14-day quarantine in a government-approved location or facility. Land borders are now completely closed. Currently, foreigners are not allowed to enter the country, except for residents and nationals.

Burkina Faso – total of 1,357 cases, with 5 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – commercial flights operate, but are very limited. Some of the country’s provinces may still be under a state of emergency and have a curfew in place. Some cities face a ban on entry and exit, specifically for long-distance travel. Face masks are mandatory, nationwide. Professional gatherings of more than 25 people are forbidden – religious and family gatherings are banned; public gatherings of more than 50 people are banned. Travelers entering Burkina Faso are subject to 14-day quarantine and to up to three COVID-19 tests. International flights have resumed on August 1 – the country’s borders still remain closed. Domestic air services have also resumed.

Burundi – total of 445 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – flights to and from the country operate, but are very limited. Travelers entering the country are subject to 14-day quarantine that will be paid by the travelers themselves. Land borders are closed. Screening measures are in place for anyone entering the country. The country’s international airport and land borders have been opened on August 1. However, tight restrictions are in place, travelers are either subject to quarantine or may not be allowed to enter the country.

Cameroon – total of 19,142 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Travel through Cameroon is limited; the authorities advise against all but essential travel. Public transportation is limited in terms of seating. Gatherings of more than 50 people are forbidden. Most non-essential shops and businesses are allowed to reopen, with restrictive measures in place. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory. Travelers entering the country are subject to 14-day quarantine regardless if their initial COVID-19 test comes negative. They will have to be tested again once they leave the quarantine, in order to withdraw their passports. Flight operators are slowly resuming some of their flights. Land and maritime borders are entirely closed.

Cape Verde – total of 3,778 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – external borders are closed and flights are suspended for the time being. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory. People are advised to leave their homes only for essential purposes. Most non-essential shops and businesses are open again. Public gatherings are forbidden. Foreign citizens and travelers may not be allowed to enter the country. A State of Calamity is in place until October 31.

Central African Republic – total of 4,700 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Bangui Airport is closed until September 13. Commercial flights have resumed operation at certain international airports, but most are restricted to one flight per week. Non-essential shops and businesses are slowly reopening as of June 12. Travelers entering the country – and coming from a COVID-19 risk area – are subject to 21-day quarantine. Large gatherings are banned. Face masks are mandatory in public places. Travelers/foreigners may be banned from entering the country, with some exceptions. Some of the country’s neighbors have closed their land borders, meaning that travelers stuck in the Central African Republic may not be able to leave the country on land.

Chad – total of 1,008 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Airports have been reopened. Commercial flights have been resumed – from now on, people entering the country are required to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test; they may also be required to self-quarantine for 7 days. Passengers/travelers entering Chad are subject to 14-day quarantine, with all expenses covered by the country’s government. The capital and provincial capitals are facing entry and exit bans. Provinces may be subject to curfew. Face masks are mandatory in public areas – non-compliance may result in imprisonment. Most of the country’s land borders are still open.

Comoros – total of 423 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. International flights are suspended for the time being and ports are not allowing any ships from affected countries to dock. Travelers coming from China or Japan are subject to restrictions or quarantine. All travelers entering the country are subject to 14-day quarantine and screening measures. Gatherings are forbidden. Public transport is available but limited. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas and transport.

Democratic Republic of the Congo – total of 10,045 cases, with 38 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. All travelers that wish to enter Congo and come from a coronavirus-affected country will have to self-quarantine for 14 days before attempting to enter the country. Quarantine measures are slowly being lifted. Face masks are mandatory in public areas. Gatherings of more than 20 people are forbidden. Most non-essential shops, businesses, and facilities are closed. Public transportation is limited in terms of seating. Land and sea borders are closed. Entry in the country is allowed on exceptional basis. The country is now out of the  State of Emergency. Restrictions are also set to relax from August 15. The country’s borders have been reopen – requirements for entry and leave are in place.

Djibouti – total of 5,385 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. International flights have resumed – the country’s air, sea, and land borders have also reopened. The lockdown is reportedly being gradually lifted. Face masks are mandatory in public areas. Non-essential shops, businesses, and services are slowly reopening. Travel to and from Djibouti is still seeing plenty restrictions. Arrivals in Djibouti, if any, are subject to 14-day quarantine and to a COVID-19 test.

Egypt – total of 98,497 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – flights have restarted, but restrictions are still in place. Commercial flights are available, but very limited. Non-essential shops, businesses and services are allowed to open at 25% capacity. Beaches and public parks are closed. Travelers entering Egypt will have to stay in Hurghada or Sharm El Sheikh. Face masks are mandatory in public and onboard. Travelers entering Egypt are subject to 14-day quarantine. South Sinai’s international airport is expected to resume flights on August 5. All travelers entering the country are subject to mandatory COVID-19 testing – tourists on non-stop flights that will land in certain resort cities are exempted from the mandatory testing. Starting from September, all passengers arriving in any Egyptian airport are required to show proof of a negative PCR test, regardless of nationality. With September 1, anyone entering the country must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test.

Equatorial Guinea – total of 4,941 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are not restrictive – some limited commercial flights are available to and from Malabo. Travelers entering the country with no proof of a negative COVID-19 test are subject to testing and quarantine. Local flights may still operate. Land, air, and sea borders are currently closed until further notice. The catering and hotel sector has been reopened. Confinement measures are slowly being lifted. Most places of leisure are still closed, however.

Eritrea – total of 318 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. The country’s land borders are also closed – entry is banned until further notice. A lockdown is in place, making travel for non-essential purposes banned. Gatherings of more than 10 people are banned. The use of private vehicles is banned. Non-essential shops and businesses are closed. Public transportation is suspended.

Ethiopia – total of 49,654 cases, with 1,638 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – most airlines have resumed flights, but limited, and flights to certain countries, such as the US, may be banned. Land borders are closed. Travelers can enter the country but have to complete a health declaration form. Screening may be in place at airports. Travelers are not allowed to stay overnight at the airport and are advised to have onward tickets for the same day they land in Ethiopia. The country is currently under a state of emergency until around September. Gatherings of more than four people are banned. Non-essential shops and businesses are closed. Face masks are mandatory in public areas. Social distancing measures are in place. Public transport is either limited or banned.

Gabon – total of 8,505 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – commercial flights are expected to resume in July, with two international flights per week. European tourists and travelers may not be granted visas when and if the EU excludes Gabon from the safe countries list. Land and sea borders are closed. Travel through Gabon is limited – people can travel by train, boat, and air within the country. Non-essential shops and businesses may reopen but must enforce restrictive measures and limitations. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas. Travelers arriving in Gabon are subject to 15-day quarantine. European tourists will not be able to enter the country if the EU excludes Gabon from the safe list.

Gambia – total of 2,895 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – there are commercial flights operating to and from the country, but they are very limited. Flights are suspended until September 30. The state of emergency ended on the 1st of July. The country’s land border with Senegal remains closed. People entering Gambia are subject to 14-day quarantine. Non-essential shops and businesses are open but still limited. Social distancing measures are recommended and social gatherings are limited. There is a curfew in place until the end of August.

Ghana – total of 44,205 cases, with 87 recent ones. Flights are not restricted – Kotoka Airport has resumed regulad international passenger travel. Domestic flights are still allowed. Non-essential shops and businesses are allowed to reopen but with restrictions in place. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory. People arriving in Ghana are subject to 14-day quarantine. Some commercial carriers are expected to resume operations throughout August.

Guinea – total of 9,251 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. The Gbessia International Airport has reopened – there are commercial options, but they may be limited. Land and maritime borders are closed until further notice. The health state of emergency is expected to be in place until July 15 – it has been extended for up to 30 days; expected to end throughout August. Gatherings of more than 30 people are banned in Conakry – 100 people maximum in the rest of the country. Most non-essential shops, businesses, and services are still closed. Depending on the area, there may be curfews in place.

Guinea-Bissau – total of 2,205 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Land and sea borders are closed until further notice. International flights are suspended. The country is under a state of emergency and only essential businesses are operating. Public transport is suspended. All new arrivals are subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine, regardless of proof of negative testing.

Ivory Coast – total of 17,893 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted.  Commercial flights are now operating to and from the country, but only on a limited number of routes. Entry in the country is based on an online travel declaration – this may also imply temperature screenings, tests, and so on. The country’s land borders are closed until the 15th of July.  A State of Emergency is in place until July 15 – it has been extended until the end of August. Most non-essential shops, businesses, and services are closed. Gatherings of more than 50 people are forbidden. Depending on the area, lockdown measures may be in place.

Kenya – total of 34,057 cases, with 263 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. International air travel has resumed – several airways will resume flights to and from various destination throughout August. Anyone entering the country is subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine and must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test if they don’t want to be subject to quarantine. A daily curfew is in place, between 9pm and 4am. Face masks are mandatory in public areas and businesses that are open. Social distancing measures are also in place. Most non-essential shops and businesses are closed. Gatherings and meetings are banned. A curfew is in place until September 26.

Lesotho – total of 1,051 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. The country’s land borders are closed for travelers. Some airlines operate flights, but entry and exit from the country are limited and allowed only based on the approval of the Ministry of Home Affairs. Face masks are mandatory in public places – lockdown-like measures are in place and people are advised to stay indoors. Most non-essential shops, businesses, and services are either closed, have restricted opening hours, or are limited to home delivery. Gatherings of any kind of more than 50 people are forbidden. Travelers entering the country will be tested and subject to 14-day quarantine.

Liberia – total of 1,304 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Roberts International Airport is now operating commercial flights and other airlines will most likely resume their schedule soon. The country is under a state of emergency until July 22, but the Roberts International Airport was allowed to open, for commercial flights, in late June. Other airlines are unsure of their future schedule. All of the country’s land borders are closed, but ports remained open. Arriving travelers will be screened and may be subject to quarantine – some COVID-19 rapid tests are in place. Face masks, social distancing, and hygiene measures are mandatory and will be enforced by security forces. Travel between counties may require travel permits. Non-essential shops and businesses are partially closed. Gatherings are limited.

Libya – total of 13,423 cases, with 465 recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – civil aviation is suspended; Misrata airport is open only to repatriation flights. Flights have been resumed at the Mitiga airport. Enhanced screening measures are in place at all of the country’s entry points – land, sea, air. A curfew may be in place, depending on the area. Quarantine and lockdown-type measures may be enforced with little to no notice. The country’s eastern borders have been reopened.

Madagascar – total of 14,843 cases, with 52 recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – all domestic and international flights are suspended until further notice. Cruise ships are not allowed in the country’s ports. The Health State of Emergency is in effect until July 12. Vehicle travel is restricted. Some areas may be affected by a curfew. Public transportation is restrictive and limited. Gatherings of more than 50 people are forbidden. Face masks are mandatory outdoors. Travelers arriving to Madagascar from China, South Korea, Italy, or Iran are subject to 14-day quarantine – but some of them may be denied entry.

Malawi – total of 5,528 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Travelers without a residence permit and who are traveling from high-risk countries are no longer allowed to enter Malawi. Returning residents and nationals are subject to 14-day quarantine. Travelers entering the country will face enhanced screening measures, questionnaires, and so on. Security forces are allowed to enforce restrictions. Non-essential shops, businesses, and services are closed. Social and cultural gatherings are forbidden.

Mali – total of 2,757 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. International flights and airports resumed operations. The country’s land and air borders are currently closed until further notice. Entry in the country is made only with proof of a negative COVID-19 test. Some hotels are now open. Enhanced quarantine and screening measures are in place. Face masks are mandatory in public areas. Events and gatherings of all types of more than 50 people are banned. Most non-essential shops, businesses, and services are closed. Social distancing measures are in place. Travelers entering the country are subject to 14-day quarantine.

Mauritania – total of 7,012 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted and suspended until further notice. Airports are closed until September 9. Land and maritime borders are also closed. Non-essential shops, businesses, and services are allowed to reopen but must enforce restrictive measures – social distancing and face masks are mandatory.

Mauritius – total of 355 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Currently, there are no commercial flights into Mauritius available. Flights to Paris are running on a weekly basis, but entry to the country is suspended until further notice. People entering or returning to Mauritius are subject to 14-day quarantine. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public places. Non-essential shops, businesses, and services are allowed to open but must have prevention measures in place. People are subject to temperature screenings. Passengers are currently not allowed to enter the country.

Mayotte – total of 3,301 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted. Travelers who wish to enter the country are subject to medical examinations and 14-day quarantine. Entry to Mayotte and other French Overseas Territories is based on a travel certificate obtained from mainland France. Travel within these territories also requires a travel certificate. Travel to the country is extremely restricted – only essential or urgent travelers are allowed to enter.

Morocco – total of 60,056 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Flights to and from certain areas of the country is restricted until further notice – most airlines have engaged in preliminary operations and may resume their flight schedule soon. Commercial flights operate, but are very limited. Quarantine measures are in place – travelers are subject to 14-day quarantine and enhanced screening measures. Morocco has been removed from the “safe travel” list of EU – the country has also imposed firm lockdown measures in some of its regions as the number of active cases is rising.

Mozambique – total of 3,760 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – flights are suspended until September 7. Borders are partially opened. All people entering the country are subject to mandatory 14-day self-isolation. The State of Emergency is in effect until July 30. Visas that would expire during the State of Emergency are extended until September. A strict quarantine regime is in place. Non-essential shops, businesses, and services are allowed to reopen but must respect the preventive measures – limited workforce, social distancing, and sanitation. Face masks are mandatory in public areas. The country has entered another month of State of Emergency on August 7. The government wants to relax some of the restrictions after this period. Commercial flights to and from Maputo operate, but are very limited.

Namibia – total of 7,116 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted; commercial flights no longer operate – all flights are suspended until September 30. All of the country’s borders and ports are closed. Nationals and residents returning to the country are subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine. A State of Emergency is in place until September 17. This implies mandatory social distancing, mandatory face masks in public areas and transportation, gatherings of up to 250 people. Non-essential shops, businesses, and services are allowed to reopen but must enforce the State of Emergency restrictive measures – depending on the area. Restrictions for international tourists have been relaxed on July 31.

Niger – total of 1,175 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – travelers entering the country are subject to mandatory 14-day self-isolation. International passenger flights to and from the country are now available – proof of negative COVID-19 testing is recommended.The country’s land borders are closed. International flights are suspended – domestic flights are not restricted. Non-essential shops, businesses, and services may reopen but must enforce preventive measures. A state of emergency is in effect until July 11. Gatherings of more than 50 people are banned. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory.

Nigeria – total of 53,727 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – international flights have resumed; restrictions are in place and testing before entry is required. Domestic flights are reportedly enabled. Travel through Nigeria’s states is allowed outside of the curfew hours. Curfew is in place, until July 27, between 10pm and 4am. Face masks are mandatory in public places. Gatherings of more than 20 people are forbidden. Most non-essential shops, businesses, and services remain closed. Travelers entering Nigeria are subject to 14-day quarantine.

Republic of the Congo – total of 3,979 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – commercial flights operate, but are very limited. The State of Health Emergency is in place until July 11. International passenger flights are suspended until further notice – the country’s land borders are closed as well. Lockdown measures are in place – people are not allowed to leave their homes, curfews are in place, non-essential shops and businesses are closed, gatherings of more than 50 people are banned, face masks are mandatory in public places, and social distancing measures are in place. Movement through the country is generally free but may be limited. Travelers arriving in Republic of the Congo are subject to 14-day quarantine. The country’s borders opened on August 15.

Reunion – total of 1,634 cases, with 77 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – travelers entering the country are subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine. Entry in Reunion is based on a travel certificate obtained from mainland France. There are only three international flights per week operating. Local travel is restricted. Lockdown-like measures may be in place.

Rwanda – total of 3,843 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – flights have restarted – all arrivals must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test. Flights to most airports are suspended and the country’s land borders are closed. International and domestic tourism is allowed only through charter flights. New arrivals are subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine. Rwanda is currently street-testing Kigali citizens. There is a curfew in place, between 9pm and 5am. Face masks are mandatory in public places. Some non-essential shops, businesses, and services are allowed to resume their activity but must follow the health guidelines in place. Public meetings and mass gatherings are forbidden.

Sao Tome and Principe – total of 895 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted. Returning nationals and residents are subject to mandatory quarantine. Ships are not allowed to dock. Sea and air connections are suspended and travel between islands is forbidden. The country is currently in phase 2 of lifting the restrictions – airports are set to reopen, as well as casinos, hotels, and guest houses. Most non-essential shops and businesses may also reopen. From July 16, phase 3 will commence, which implies the resumption of international commercial flights and the reopening of markets, gyms, and other leisure services. Commercial and charter passenger flights are suspended until further notice.

Senegal – total of 13,556 cases, with 100 recent ones.Flights are partially restricted. International flights are now operating – the majority of airlines have also resumed commercial routes. Flights are partially restricted – Air Senegal is expected to resume services in July while others throughout August. As a result of the European flight blacklist, Senegal has banned all EU travelers from entering the country. International commercial flights are slowly resuming as the State of Emergency ended – they will presumably resume around July 15. Travel through Senegal is mostly free – internal flights are available, non-essential shops, businesses, and services are open but with sanitary and social distancing measures in place. Travelers entering the country are subject to 14-day self-quarantine.

Seychelles – total of 136 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – airports have reopened. Passenger flights are set to resume on the 1st of August. At the moment, all travelers arriving in Seychelles must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test if they want to be accommodated. Travelers arriving in the country are also subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine. Non-essential shops, businesses, and services are allowed to reopen but must enforce social distancing measures. Face masks are mandatory in public areas. Passenger flights have been resumed on August 1 – only travelers from countries with a low or medium COVID-19 risk are allowed to enter the country.

Sierra Leone – total of 2,019 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – flights have restarted; keep in mind that the commercial options are likely to be very limited. Some airlines are taking reservations for flights set to depart from the country in July and August. Travelers coming from countries with more than 50 COVID-19 cases are subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine. The country is currently under a State of Emergency until May 2021. There is a curfew in place, between 11pm and 6am. Events and gatherings of more than 100 people are forbidden. Face masks are mandatory in public spaces.

Somalia – total of 3,310 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – airports have reopened. Outbound and inbound commercial flights to the capital city are suspended until further notice. Internal flights have also been suspended. Travelers arriving in Somalia or traveling through Europe or North America are subject to 14-day quarantine or may be denied to board Somalia-bound planes. Several prevention measures have been added – limitations on public gatherings, business opening hours, curfews, transportation within the country, and so on. Social distancing measures are in place.

South Africa – total of 622 ,551 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – flights have been entirely suspeded. The country’s land borders are closed until further notice. Authorities advise against non-essential travel. Internal flights have been resumed, but not for travel or recreational purposes. Face masks are mandatory in public places and transport. Social gatherings are forbidden. Travelers entering South Africa from any of the several banned countries are subject to 14-day quarantine.

South Sudan – total of 2,519 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – flights have restarted. Flights to and from Juba are available – specifically with carriers like FLy Dubai, Kenyan Airways, and Ethiopian Airlines. Even though the country’s land borders were reopened, they are in effect closed due to restrictions of neighboring countries. Inbound international flights are available for travelers that show proof of a negative COVID-19 test – they will still have to self-isolate for 14 days. A curfew is in place, between 10pm and 6am. Non-essential shops, businesses, and services are mostly open but must enforce strict social distancing measures. There are also restrictions on internal movement and gatherings.

Sudan – total of 13,189 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – flights are suspended until October 10. The Khartoum state is currently in lockdown until the 7th of July and its airport is closed until the 12th. Airports, land borders, and ports are closed. Public transport services and internal flights have been suspended until further notice. Non-essential shops and businesses are closed. Curfews are in place. All new arrivals in Sudan are subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine.

Tanzania – total of 509 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – international chartered, passenger, and private flights are suspended; commercial flights have begun to operate to and from the country, but anyone entering must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test. Cross-border travel services are mostly suspended until further notice. The country is collecting tracking information for all foreigners on its territory – they may also be subject to 14-day quarantine. Domestic flights are operational but limited. Public gatherings of any type are banned. Non-essential shops, businesses, and services are closed. Lockdown-like and quarantine measures are in place throughout the country, accompanied by heavy monitorization. Tanzania recently cancelled the plans to allow Kenya Airways to operate flights between the two countries.

Togo – total of 1,390 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – flights have restarted. People arriving in Togo from a high-risk country have to engage in 14-day self-isolation. The state of emergency has been reinstated. Commercial flights are in place, but very limited. The country’s air borders reopened on August 1and commercial flights started operating on August 3.

Tunisia – total of 3,572 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – two airlines have reopened their services, with Tunisair re-enabling its international flight service. The country’s land, air, and sea borders are reportedly open and the country ended its curfew. Travelers currently trying to enter the country will have their travel history analyzed and, based on that, will be allowed or denied entry in Tunisia. COVID-19 testing may be required, as well as 14-day quarantine. Travel through Tunisia is mostly free. Non-essential shops, businesses, and services are allowed to open at full capacity. Face masks are mandatory in public places. Entry into Tunisia is based on the traveler’s country of origin and the specific country’s prevalence of the epidemic.

Uganda – total of 2,847 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – flights are currently suspended. Ports and land borders are closed. Any traveler arriving in the country is subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine, which may also involve testing for COVID-19. Face masks are mandatory in public areas. There is also a curfew in place – from 7pm to 6:30am. Public transportation is open but only with 50% occupancy limit. Gatherings of more than 5 people are forbidden. Non-essential shops and businesses are mostly closed – malls and supermarkets are allowed to open at the moment but must enforce safety measures.

Zambia – total of 12,025 cases, with 123 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – Zambia Airways delayed the restart of its operations once again, while ProFlight Zambia is to resume operations in July and August. The country’s borders are open – extensive screening measures are in place. All tourist visas for Zambia have been temporarily suspended. Travelers are currently not allowed to enter the country. People arriving in the country are not subject to quarantine. Travel within the country is mostly open – local airlines have resumed their operations. Night clubs and bars will remain closed until further notice. Travelers entering the country may be tested for COVID-19. Commercial flights are operating to and from Zambia. All passengers are required to arrive at Lusaka and are subject to various restrictions.

Zimbabwe – total of 6,406 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – flights are currently suspended. Borders are also closed and only citizens are allowed to return to the country. People entering the country may have to present the authorities with a negative COVID-19 test to be allowed to enter. Travel history and nationality may be taken into account. Gatherings of more than 100 people are forbidden. Nationwide lockdown-measures are in place until further notice. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas, workspaces, and so on. People should leave their homes only for essential needs and services.

 

AFRICA COVID-19 Safest Countries to Travel

  1. Seychelles (136 cases)
  2. Mauritius (356 cases)
  3. Tanzania (509 cases)
  4. Sao Tome and Principe (898 cases)

 

AFRICA COVID-19 Official Statements and Updates

The African countries with the most reported cases in the last week are South Africa, Egypt, Morocco, Ethiopia, and Nigeria.

Most deaths are in South Africa.

The trend has been, overall, stable throughout the continent.

 

 

 

ASIA COVID-19 Travel Safety

  • Red Zone

Afghanistan; Azerbaijan; Bangladesh; China; India; Iraq; Kyrgyzstan; Nepal; Oman; Philippines; Qatar; Uzbekistan; Myanmar; Vietnam.

  • Yellow Zone

Brunei; Cambodia; Hong Kong; Indonesia; Jordan; Mongolia; Pakistan; Singapore; South Korea; Sri Lanka; Syria; Thailand; Turkey; Yemen; Bahrain; Iran; Bhutan; Turkmenistan; Tajikistan; Japan; Cyprus; Kuwait; Israel; Russia; Saudi Arabia; Tajikistan

  • Green Zone

Maldives; Timor-Leste; Taiwan; Laos; Lebanon; United Arab Emirates.

 

ASIA COVID-19 Current Restrictions per Country

Afghanistan – total of 38,162 cases, with 19 recent ones. Flights are not restrictive in this country – commercial flights options to and from Afghanistan are extremely limited. Commercial flights are now operating as well. Screening measures are in place at the country’s entry points. Depending on symptoms and/or screening results, travelers entering the country may be subject to quarantine/isolation. Travel within the country is currently limited. Valid reasons are required to travel between the country’s provinces. Turkey suspended all flights to Iran and Afghanistan until September 1.

Bahrain – total of 51,391 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – passengers are currently not allowed to enter the country. Commercial flights to and from Bahrain are now operating – under reduced service. All but citizens and residents are not allowed entry to the country. Travelers arriving in the country are subject to testing, screening, and quarantine. Face masks are mandatory and social distancing is advised. Gatherings of more than 5 people are forbidden. Non-essential shops and businesses are mostly open but must enforce strict social distancing and safety measures.

Bangladesh – total of 310,822 cases, with 1,897 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – flights aer currently suspended, while some entries may require people proof of a negative COVID-19 test. International flights from a number of countries are forbidden to land in Bangladesh. Travelers arriving in the country may be subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine. There is a curfew in place – from 22 to 5. Non-essential travel is still forbidden. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public places. Meetings and rallies are also forbidden. Public transportation is open but with limited capacity. Certain zones within the country may be labeled as red zones and have strict lockdown-like measures in place. Some commercial passenger flights have been resumed – such flights from the UK and several other countries are also now allowed to land in the country.

Bhutan – Total of 195 cases, with no recent cases. Flights are partially restricted – visa on arrival has been suspended. Borders are currently closed and all travelers must have visa clearance in order to enter the country. Travel within the country is rather limited. Social distancing measures are in place. Travelers entering the country are subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine. Travelers that are not nationals of Maldives, India, and Bangladesh must get visa clearance before entering the country. The relaxation of COVID-19 restrictions began on September 1.

Brunei – total of 144 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – passengers are currently not allowed to enter the country. The country’s airlines have resumed flights to several countries – keep in mind that an exit ban is also in place. Travel outside of Brunei is also restricted or very limited – those wishing to leave the country must get permission to do so. Access to the country is restricted. Anyone entering the country is subject to mandatory quarantine and COVID-19 testing. Non-essential shops and businesses are closed. Public gatherings are not advised. The Royal Brunei Airlines will provide limited services to MEL, HKG KUL, NML, and SIN until August 31 – other than that, the airline suspended most of its routes.

Cambodia – total of 273 cases, with no recent cases. Flights are partially restricted – some airlines are expected to resume operations towards the end of July and August. Travelers entering the country are subject to testing, screening, and mandatory quarantine – they are also required to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test if they want to avoid paying for one issued by the authorities of Cambodia. Travel within the country is allowed but may be limited in some areas. The country has banned all flights from Indonesia, Malaysia, and Philippines.

China – total of 85,031 cases, with 9 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – some airlines plan to resume operations to a number of international airports during July, August, and September. Some commercial flights are operating to and from China, while international airlines are allowed to operate one route with one flight to China per week. Ferry services between Taipa and Hong Kong are closed. Depending on their visa status, travelers may not be allowed to enter the country. Travelers entering the country are subject to testing, screening, and quarantine. Travel within the country is restricted. People are required to use health apps and their temperature may be checked often. While movement is generally free, people currently in China must document their travel/movement history, symptoms, and so on. Mandatory quarantines are in place for people arriving at a number of Chinese airports. Flights from various area of the world – Europe and Canada mostly – will resume throughout September/October.

Hong Kong – total of 4,802 cases, with 15 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – some airlines are expected to resume limited operations throughout July. Only residents are allowed to enter the country at the moment. Travelers are subject to screening, testing, and mandatory quarantine. All borders with mainland China are closed until further notice. Ferry crossings are also not in operation. Quarantine measures are in place throughout the country – in some cases, they are very strict. Gatherings of more than 50 people are forbidden. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory. Depending on the country of origin, travelers are subject to a number of restrictive measures. Depending on where you come from, you may be required to self-quarantine in a pre-booked hotel room. Travelers from China are allowed to transit through Hong Kong.

India – total of 3,588,098 cases, with 48,386 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – some airlines have resumed international flights as well as bookings. Regular international flights are still suspended – they will remain so until the end of September. Kempegowda International Airport has resumed international flights to 14 countries. All of the country’s land borders are closed until further notice. New arrivals are subject to screening, testing, and mandatory 14-day quarantine. Containment zones are still under lockdown until August 31. There is a curfew in place, from 10pm to 5am. Local travel is limited or may be even stopped. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory throughout the country. Large gatherings are forbidden. Restrictions vary between states. Manipur lockdown has been extended until August 15 and in Bugdam until August 10.

Indonesia – total of 172,053 cases, with 2,858 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – some airlines are slowly resuming international flights, but with limitations; there are commercial flights operating to and from the country. Travelers entering the country may be subject to a PCR test. Foreign nationals are currently not allowed to enter or transit through the country. Foreigners with limited and permanent stay permits may be allowed to enter the country. Public activities and services are open but operate within social distancing limitations. Face masks are mandatory in public areas. The country is set to reopen its borders for foreign tourists on September 11. The country is currently allowing only domestic tourists and maintains strict health protocols. Bali will remain closed until the end of the year.

Iran – total of 373,570 cases, with 1,754 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – passengers are not allowed to enter the country; Iran Air resumed some of its services and will add more flights throughout July. Travelers entering or leaving the country may be subject to testing and screening. Travel through Iran is restricted. There are health measures in place, such as the banning of public events. It is worth noting that Iran comes with no reports of quarantined citizens or foreigners. Flights from Iran to Turkey are suspended until September.

Iraq – total of 227,446 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – flights restarted. Regular and commercial flights may have resumed operations, depending on region. Travelers arriving in the country may be subject to quarantine. Traveling to and from Iraq is done based on an approval letter issued by the Crises and Health Office of the country – as well as on visa, passport, and so on. Public gatherings are still restricted, while face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas. Travel within Iraq is restricted – people may not be allowed to enter or leave certain provinces or may require a permit to do so. Non-essential shops and businesses are still facing restrictions. Some areas within the country are currently experiencing lockdowns. Flights between Iraq and Turkey are suspended until October 1.

Israel – total of 113,648 cases, with 183 recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – passengers are not allowed to enter the country at the moment. Currently, commercial flights do operate to and from the country, but on a limited number of routes. Travelers may not be allowed to enter the country – this restriction is in effect until at least September 1. Those arriving in Israel are subject to testing, screening, and even mandatory 14-day quarantine. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public places, public transportation, gatherings, and within businesses. Any travelers – including Israeli citizens – coming from high-risk countries will not be allowed to enter the country.

Japan – total of 66,423 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – most airlines have resumed their operations, but have strict health measures in place. Travelers coming from several countries – roughly 130 – are not allowed to enter Japan – depending on and according to their number of cases. Travelers arriving in Japan may be subject to extensive screening and to mandatory 14-day quarantine. Non-essential shops and businesses are open – as well as events, social activities, and so on. However, they are accompanied by strict safety measures – face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas, transportation, closed spaces, and so on. Gatherings of more than 1000 people are forbidden. Self-quarantine is advised upon entering the country. The prefecture of Okinawa is under a State of Emergency until August 15. Business travelers from Taiwan will be able to enter the country starting with September 8.

Jordan – total of 1,893 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – flights are suspended until September 7. Domestic flights have been resumed. Sea and land borders are also closed until August 31. The Jordanian authorities strongly suggest that the above-mentioned restrictions may be in place beyond July 14 and that travelers should avoid entering the country. People are allowed to leave their homes between 6am and 12pm. Domestic tourism is now allowed. Non-essential, shops, businesses, and services are mostly open but with restrictions in place. Public transportation is enabled but at only 50% capacity. Face masks, gloves, and social distancing are mandatory in public places, shops, and most closed spaces. People entering the country are subject to testing and quarantine. The resumption of international flights has been resumed until August 18. The country’s main land border crossing with Syria is currently closed.

Kuwait – total of 84,636 cases, with 412 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – Kuwait Airways is expected to resume operations in October; international travel has now resumed but people that come from 31 high-alert countries are not allowed to board commercial flights to Kuwait. Commercial flights operate within the country but do so on a limited number of routes. Nationals are advised against traveling abroad. The country’s International Airport is expected to resume operations, but limited, on August 1. Travelers may not be allowed to enter the country. Some of the country’s land borders are closed. There is a curfew in place, from 8pm until 5am. Several areas still have lockdown-like measures in place. Non-essential shops and businesses are slowly reopening, but some may be limited to delivery and drive-through only.

Kyrgyzstan – total of 43,820 cases, with 108 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – passengers are currently not allowed to enter the country. Travelers/foreign nationals may not be allowed to enter the country. Visa services have been suspended until further notice. The use of land borders is temporarily limited/restricted. People arriving in the country may be subject to 14-day quarantine, depending on the country they come from. Face masks are mandatory in public places. Travel within the country is limited and may even be restricted. Certain cities may reintroduce previously lifted restrictions to prevent the spread of the virus. Non-essential shops and businesses are open only during certain hours of the day, while events, bars, night clubs, and other social events are closed/forbidden. Istanbul-Bishkek services have been resumed by the Turkish airlines.

Laos – total of 22 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – flights are suspended until September 30. The airport visa service is temporarily suspended. At the moment, only essential people/persons may be allowed to enter the country, while travelers coming from countries with a COVID-19 outbreak will be denied entry. Testing and screening measures are in place at border crossings. Travel within Laos is free of restrictions. Face masks are mandatory in public areas and some services may check temperatures. Non-essential shops and businesses were allowed to reopen but with preventive measures in place. Social distancing is advised. Vientiane-Hanoi route has some flights operating but, overall, the country’s borders remain closed to foreigners.

Lebanon – total of 16,275 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – commercial flights to and from Lebanon have resumed, but they operate on limited routes and require travelers to fill online health declarations before boarding. Travelers entering the country are no longer subject to 14-day self-quarantine. People wishing to enter the country are required, if possible, to take a COVID-19 test before their trip to Lebanon and present the results when they land. Passengers are subject to extensive screening and testing measures. The country is under a general mobilization until August. Public gatherings are forbidden. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public places. Non-essential shops, businesses, and services were allowed to reopen but may be closed with little to no notice. Internal restrictions are in place until August 10. A State of Emergency has been declared in Beirut following the massive explosion.

Maldives – total of 7,578 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – Maldivian resumed its operations in July, Flyme stops flights temporarily. Commercial flights now operate to and from the country – they are very limited and operate only on a couple of routes. The ban on foreign nationals entering Maldive – from a select number of countries – has been lifted. Nationals and residents may freely return. People who have recently traveled through certain countries are also not allowed to enter. On July 14, the public health emergency state and curfew will be lifted. Travel within the Maldives and between the islands is not restricted. Gatherings of more than 30 people are forbidden. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas and transport. Guesthouses will be reopened for tourists on August 1, while resorts on July 15. There is a Public Health Emergency in place until August 7.

Mongolia – total of 301 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – passengers are not allowed to enter the country until September 15. The country is under a state of readiness until July 15 – this closes all international rail and air routes, as well as some border crossings. Occasional charter flights are available. Public gatherings are restricted, as well as social events. Face masks are mandatory in public places. Hotels and most accommodations are open. Travelers entering the country are subject to 21-day quarantine under observation and then to 14-day self-isolation.

Myanmar – total of 749 cases, with 16 recent cases. Flights are totally restricted – flights are suspended until September 30. Visas are restricted and international flights banned until the end of July. Travelers entering the country are subject to 28-day quarantine. They are also required to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken prior to entering the country. National travel is mostly available now. Gatherings of more than 5 people are forbidden. A curfew may be in place in several regions of the country. Stay-at-home orders are in place in some provinces. Non-essential shops and businesses are slowly reopening but with social distancing measures in place. Anyone entering the country is subject to mandatory quarantine.

Nepal – total of 38,561 cases, with 1,221 recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – airlines suspended all of their flights until further notice. Domestic flights are suspended until September 16. Regular international flights are expected to resume on September 1. Commercial flights to and from the country exist, but are very limited. A countrywide lockdown is in place until July 22 – land borders are also closed to third country nationals. Travel within the country is generally free, but several restrictions are in place – vehicle travel is limited, travel between districts requires approval. Non-essential shops and businesses are reopening – but face masks and social distancing are mandatory.

Oman – total of 85,544 cases, with 539 recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – flights are suspended until September 15. The country is, at the moment, under full nationwide lockdown, until August 8. At the moment, travelers are not allowed to enter the country. All but Omani nationals are allowed to leave the country. Most non-essential shops, businesses, and services are closed throughout the country. Public gatherings are forbidden. Certain areas are still under lockdown. This makes travel within the country rather limited. There may be curfews in place. Public transport may be suspended temporarily. Omani nationals returning to the country are subject to 14-day institutional quarantine. The travel ban between the governorates has been lifted and the curfew has been reduced as well. Dhofar will remain under full lockdown until further notice.

Pakistan – total of 295,636 cases, with 264 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – the country’s government has allowed, on August 7, all of its airports to fully resume international flight operations. Social distancing measures are in place throughout the country. Face masks are mandatory in public places. Most events are highly restricted – such as gatherings, weddings, religious gatherings, and so on. Public transportation has been suspended in some areas. People entering the country are subject to mandatory quarantine in hospitals or isolation facilities. The country’s trains are allowed to operate at full capacity.

Philippines – total of 217,396 cases, with 4,284 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – some airlines have resumed domestic operations. Travelers entering the country are subject to 14-day quarantine. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas and transport. The country is under an Enhanced Community Quarantine until July 15. Certain areas are subject to more restrictions, depending on the number of cases. Arrivals are subject to testing and screening. The country’s restrictions have been extended until mid-August. Foreign nationals are now allowed to enter the country but must have valid visas. Manila and its outlying areas are currently under lockdown. Foreigners are allowed to enter the country, but only with a valid visa. Commercial flights are operating.

Qatar – total of 118,575 cases, with 168 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – Qatar Airways runs some flights through the month of August. Inbound flights are suspended and travelers with all types of visas are not allowed to enter Qatar. Nationals/citizens returning in Qatar may be subject to 14-day quarantine. Social gatherings of more than 5 people are forbidden. The same applies to most events and non-essential shops and businesses. Certain shops and businesses were allowed to reopen but with severe restrictions in place – limited capacity and hours. Public transportation is suspended throughout the country until September 1. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas. Citizens and permanent residents are allowed to travel out of and return to Qatar freely. Passengers are currently not allowed to enter the country.

Saudi Arabia – total of 314,821 cases, with 910 recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – all flights to Saudi Arabia are suspended. Land borders are closed. Citizens and residents are included in the restrictions and may not return to the country. Certain areas of the country may be under a full lockdown or have curfews in place. Depending on the area, non-essential shops and businesses may be partially open. Any arrivals are subject to 14-day quarantine. The country reopened its borders with Kuwait, UAE, Bahrain.

Singapore – total of 56,771 cases, with 54 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – passengers are not allowed to enter the country. Short term visits to the country are forbidden – this means a travel ban. Long-term visits or holders of long-term passes or other approvals must obtain permission before being granted entry. Arrivals may be subject to screening, testing, and quarantine. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public places. Most non-essential shops and businesses have been allowed to reopen but with social distancing measures in place. Gatherings of more than 5 people are forbidden. Public transportation is also restricted. Any new arrivals have to wear monitoring devices during quarantine, as 14-day quarantine is still mandatory – this comes in effect from August 10.

South Korea – total of 19,699 cases, with 299 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – some airlines plan to resume some flights throughout August. Foreign nationals with long-term visas in South Korea must apply for a re-entry permit before traveling out of the country. Travelers may be required to test for COVID-19 before entering or leaving the country and may also be subject to quarantine. A lot of visa restrictions and changes are in place. Face masks are mandatory in all public places and transport. Foreign nationals that have been or have travelled through the Hubei region of China in the past 2 weeks are now allowed to enter the country.

Sri Lanka – total of 3,010 cases, with 15 recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – flights are currently suspended; commercial flights are operating from Sri Lanka, but the reopening of Colombo Airport has been delayed until further notice. Non-nationals and residents are currently not allowed to enter the country. Travelers are subject to 14-day mandatory quarantine if they wish to travel within the country. They are also subject to testing and screening. Public transportation is limited. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas. Most non-essential shops, businesses, and services are now open but with safety measures in place.

Syria – total of 2,628 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – flights are suspended until September 9. The country’s land borders are closed to passenger traffic. Any people returning to Syria are subject to 14-day quarantine. There’s a curfew in place in certain areas, from 6:00 to 18:00. Non-essential shops and businesses are allowed to reopen but with restricted schedule. Travel within Syria is rather limited – movement between certain provinces is forbidden. People entering the country are also subject to PCR testing. Certain routes to and from Syria are totally or partially closed.

Taiwan – total of 488 cases, with no recent cases. Flights are partially restricted – passengers are currently not allowed to enter the country. Foreigners are allowed to enter the country unless they are visiting friends or traveling – in short, only business purposes are valid for entry. Also, foreigners entering the country must show proof of a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit through some of the country’s airports is allowed – transit is heavily monitored and restricted. Travel within the country is overall restriction-free: public transportation is available and most non-essential shops and businesses are open. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas. Anyone entering the country is subject to 14-day quarantine.

Tajikistan – total of 8,516 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – commercial flights to and from the country are reportedly very limited. Land borders with several countries remain closed. Travelers arriving in Tajikistan are subject to screening, potential testing, and 14-day quarantine. There are no local restrictions in place. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public areas, transportation, and so on. Non-essential shops and businesses were allowed to reopen.

Thailand – total of 3,411 cases, with no recent cases. Flights are partially restricted – flights are suspended until September 30. The country’s State of Emergency has been extended until August 31. Travelers are currently allowed to enter the country, but there are limitations and restrictions in place – only certain types of people can enter, based on status, job, permission, and so on. Extensive medical records are required in order to be allowed to enter the country. All arrivals are subject to 14-day quarantine, medical expenses for testing, and so on. Local travel is restricted. Restrictions may vary in different provinces. Public gatherings are forbidden. Public smoking is also forbidden. Face masks and social distancing are advised or even mandatory. The country’s State of Emergency has been extended until September 30. International commercial flights are currently banned.

Timor-Leste – total of 27 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – passengers are currently not allowed to enter the country. The country’s borders are closed until further notice. International and domestic flight operations are restricted. Only charter flights may operate but require approval. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public places, services, and transportation. Non-essential shops and businesses were allowed to reopen but must enforce safety measures. Travelers entering the country are subject to 14-day quarantine.

United Arab Emirates – total of 69,690 cases, with 362 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – passengers are currently not allowed to enter the country. Commercial flights now operate to and from the country – starting with August 1, everyone entering the UAE will have to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test. Foreigners and residents can freely enter the country. Arrivals may also be subject to screening, testing, and quarantine, depending on the country of origin and whether they show symptoms or not. Non-essential shops and businesses are open but with restrictions in place. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in public places, transport, businesses, and other services. Tourists can now enter the country under relaxed measures. People with US passports are also able to enter the country.

Uzbekistan – total of 41,424 cases, with 264 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – passengers are currently not allowed to enter the country. Lockdown restrictions have been extended beyond August 1. Travelers from countries where the COVID-19 epidemic is not significant may be allowed to enter the country. People coming from other countries are subject to testing and 14-day quarantine. Depending on the area, local restrictions may vary – from soft to lockdown-like measures. Face masks and social distancing are mandatory in most areas. Travel through the country is limited and restricted – only people with permits may engage in local travel.

Vietnam – total of 1,040 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – passengers are not allowed to enter the country. International flights are available to and from Vietnam, but they are quite restrictive. Transit through the country is not allowed. Foreign nationals are currently not allowed to enter the country. Anyone entering or returning to the country is subject to 14-day quarantine. The country is restriction-free at the local level. Face masks are no longer mandatory in public areas but are advised in some services and on public transport. International flights to and from six Asian cities are set to resume throughout September.

Yemen – total of 1,946 cases, with no recent ones. Commercial flights are suspended. Most sea, land, and air entries into the country are closed. There are some international flights, but very limited. Anyone entering the country is subject to 14-day quarantine. Curfews may be in place within the country, as well as restrictions on movement. Non-essential shops and businesses are reportedly mostly closed. Public and private gatherings are also restricted.

 

ASIA COVID-19 Safest Countries to Travel

  1. Mongolia (310 cases)
  2. Taiwan (493 cases)

 

ASIA COVID-19 Official Statements and Updates

The Asian countries with the most reported cases in the last week are India, Iran, Bangladesh, Saudi Arabia, and Pakistan.

Most deaths are in India.

The trend has been, overall, increasing throughout the continent.

 

 

 

OCEANIA COVID-19 Travel Safety

  • Red Zone

Australia.

  • Yellow Zone

Fiji; Papua New Guinea; New Zealand.

  • Green Zone

 

 

OCEANIA COVID-19 Current Restrictions per Country

Australia – total of 25,670 cases, with 123 recent ones. Flights are partially restricted – passengers are currently not allowed to enter the country. Still, international flights and bookings remain suspended – Qantas, for example, suspended such services until March 2021. Some of the country’s regions have closed borders for all foreigners. Flights are, overall, heavily limited/restricted and schedules may change with little to no notice. Travelers are not currently allowed to enter the country – although they can request an exemption from the authorities. Anyone entering the country is subject to 14-day quarantine. Transit through the country may be forbidden, depending on permits and country of origin. South Australia planned to reopen its state borders but canceled. People are advised to stay at home in some cities. Travel within the country is mostly restricted. Greater Sydney has been declared a COVID-19 hotspot and anyone who has been there and now traveling through Australia must undergo quarantine. Regional Victoria is now into state lockdown until further notice. International flights are still banned and airports have suspended all of international operations until October 24.

Fiji – total of 28 cases, with no recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – passengers are not allowed to enter the country. Only Fiji nationals can enter the country at the moment – and they are subject to 14-day quarantine. Travelers arriving in or in transit through Fiji are subject to screening and self-isolation. There is a curfew in place, from 11pm to 4am. Gatherings of more than 100 people are forbidden. Domestic travel restrictions are slowly being lifted. Face masks and social distancing are highly recommended by the authorities.

New Zealand – total of 1,729 cases, with no recent cases. Flights are partially restricted – passengers are not allowed to enter. All of the country’s borders are closed. Only certain categories of travelers are allowed to enter the country – overall, leisure traveling is not allowed. Transit through the country is allowed as long as the travelers spend no more than 24 hours in one of New Zealand’s airports. Restrictions are mild within the country – face masks and social distancing are advised; non-essential shops and businesses can return to their normal schedule. Anyone entering the country is subject to COVID-19 testing and to 14-day managed quarantine. Restrictions have been extended until September 15. Inbound travel is also banned until the end of September.

Papua New Guinea – total of 459 cases, with 6 recent ones. Flights are totally restricted – passengers are not allowed to enter the country. Commercial flights to and from the country are available, but are very limited. New arrivals must have been subject to a COVID-19 test before entering the country and must show proof of a negative result. At the moment, travelers are not allowed to enter the country, unless they seek permission. Anyone entering the country is subject to 14-day quarantine. Holders of certain immigrant visas are banned from entering the country. Land and sea borders are closed. Public transportation is restricted. Face masks and social distancing are recommended. The country’s capital is now under 2-week lockdown – since July 28, while domestic flights have been suspended for the next 14 days. Commercial flight options remain very limited and entries require written exemption and proof of a negative COVID-19 test.

 

OCEANIA COVID-19 Safest Countries to Travel

 

Oceania is more severe in terms of restrictions. Even if New Zealand is reportedly out of active cases, they did not lift any of their restrictions. International flights are still banned until further notice.

Fiji and other islands follow New Zealand’s examples. They prevent any foreigners from entering the country. The same applies to Papua New Guinea. In short, all of Oceania is closed, at the moment – especially with Australia being in the red restriction zone.

We’ll have to wait a bit if we want to travel to this part of the world again.

 

OCEANIA COVID-19 Official Statements and Updates

The Oceanian countries with the most reported cases in the last week are Australia, Guam, New Zealand, French Polynesia, and Papua New Guinea.

Most deaths are in Australia.

The trend has been, overall, stable throughout the continent.

 

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